OT: Steve Jobs' childhood home could become historical site

Discussion in 'Apple' started by JF Mezei, Oct 3, 2013.

  1. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-24368472

    Steve Jobs' childhood home 'could become historical site'

    2 October 2013 Last updated at 16:19 BST

    The childhood home of the Apple co-founder Steve Jobs could be declared
    a historical site.

    It would mean the property, built in 1952, would have to be preserved
    for the future.

    Mr Jobs died two years ago, and now city planners in Los Altos,
    California, are in talks with his family.

    Paul Collins reports.
     
    JF Mezei, Oct 3, 2013
    #1
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  2. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    A typically ridicuous idea. What next? Preserve Bill Gates' college
    dorm room and Larry Ellison's backyard dog house. There are far too
    many idiots in local government departments with nothing useful to do
    and wasting piles of tax payer money. :-\
     
    Your Name, Oct 3, 2013
    #2
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  3. JF Mezei

    D.F. Manno Guest

    Jumping to conclusions, aren't you? The news coverage doesn't say _who_
    is seeking the designation. It could be the owner, or just interested
    Apple fans.
     
    D.F. Manno, Oct 4, 2013
    #3
  4. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest


    Having your property declared a national historic site is against the
    owner's interests. It means you can't renovate, paint etc your house
    without city approval. This greatly reduces the home's value.

    Where the existing homeowner might win is it the city/state/Apple buy
    the house from him and then have it delcared national historic site.

    Preserving the house may have value because it may become a true
    historic site later on.

    But in all honesty, I think it is a bit too early to declare Steve Jobs
    a star people will never forget. Only time will tell if he remains a
    star in the long term.

    In Canada, there are "Alexander Graham Bell" historic places in
    Brantford ON (where telephone was invented) and in Baddeck NS (where he
    had summer residence)

    Does Henry Ford have much in in terms of national historic sites
    preserved from his own life (homes etc) ?

    Do Thomas J, Watson and Charles Flint , founders of IBM, have their
    childhood homes preserved ?

    The problem is that it is too early to know whether Job's childhood home
    will have historical value in the distant future. But if the house is
    not preserved, it guarantees that it won't be there when/if people
    eventually realise he was a great american that is to be remembered for
    a very very long time.
     
    JF Mezei, Oct 5, 2013
    #4
  5. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    Yep, I did think about it being a greedy house owner after posting that
    message.

    Although a group of Apple fans could potentiall place a request, it's
    unlikely to be considered seriously by any sane person in the relevant
    government department (of course, there aren't many sane people working
    there who make these decisions).
     
    Your Name, Oct 5, 2013
    #5
  6. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    True, it does cause limitations on improvements or even simple
    maintenance... but maybe they've bought the house next door and turned
    it into a cafe and want "special status" to increase the tourists
    numbers. ;-)



    Personally I can't see any point at all preserving a building simply
    because someone lived there (or even worse, some historical person
    dubiously stayed there for one night!). The only buildings to be
    preserved should be those with some sort of REAL historical or
    architectural significance.
     
    Your Name, Oct 5, 2013
    #6
  7. Presumably it's the house that contains the garage that they supposedly
    designed the first Apple computers in.
     
    Barry Margolin, Oct 5, 2013
    #7
  8. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    Here is something Apple could do:

    Buy the house. Move it to the centre of the giant flying saucer they are
    building. Convert the house into a lounge for employees, with the garage
    preserved (perhaps a museum with old Macs on display)

    Not sure how easy it is to move californian homes without proper
    foundations/basements though. Here in Québec, moving a home is not that
    uncommon (but not very frequent). They gently lift it from foundations,
    insert a truss below, dig a path, and then put wheels under truss with
    hydraulic jacks and pull house out. (they adjust the jacks to keep house
    level as it is being pulled out of foundations).
     
    JF Mezei, Oct 5, 2013
    #8
  9. Presumably it's the house that contains the garage that they supposedly
    designed the first Apple computers in.[/QUOTE]

    No presumably about it; it is that house and garage.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Oct 5, 2013
    #9
  10. Here is something Apple could do:

    Buy the house. Move it to the centre of the giant flying saucer they are
    building. Convert the house into a lounge for employees, with the garage
    preserved (perhaps a museum with old Macs on display)[/QUOTE]

    Well, they built the first Apple Computer there, so it would be more
    fitting to have various Apple II and an Apple I there, rather than Macs.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Oct 5, 2013
    #10
  11. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    There's no actual historical value in a garage - it's just a garage,
    the same as any other thousands if not millions of garages. If you go
    there you won't see Steve Jobs building computers nor any real evidence
    that he did so (other no doubt than a silly sign on the wall saying
    so).
     
    Your Name, Oct 5, 2013
    #11
  12. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    Buildings are moved in most countries.

    Here's two examples from Auckland, New Zealand: They moved an old
    tavern building out of the way while they built a new motorway tunnel,
    and then moved it back when they had finished. They also moved Sir
    Edmund Hillary's house (he was supposedly the first person to climb
    Everest, although as always there is now some doubt) to another
    location.

    Usually they move buildings at night - supposedly because the traffic
    is less busy, they can switch off intersection traffic lights , etc.
    .... but in reality it's just to annoy all the neighbours along the
    route with the noise. ;-)
     
    Your Name, Oct 5, 2013
    #12
  13. Why is there any "historical value" in any place? For some reason,
    people like being able to see the place where something significant
    happened firsthand.
     
    Barry Margolin, Oct 6, 2013
    #13
  14. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    Some building are historically important in their own right, not
    because some person (often dubiously) visited there for 10 seconds.
    Such buildings are usually unique, rather than just a mass produced
    house that's the same as 90 other houses in the same area.
     
    Your Name, Oct 6, 2013
    #14
  15. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    Many homes were exactly that, the same as all the others. But because
    they were protected, they remained the same while the rest of the town
    was totally redevelopped and that one house that stayed is now very
    distinct.

    The question here is whether Steve Jobs was truly unique in the
    historical sense, worth preserving every bit of his life, or whether
    history will see him as a great CEO, one of many.

    Will Steve Jobs be remembers as Henry Ford or Thomas Edison or Alexender
    Graham bell, all of which started significant companies, or will he be
    remembers as Jack Welsh or Lou Gerstner who accomplished a great task
    within their organisation and may be quoted in business schools, but not
    rememberf in historical sense.
     
    JF Mezei, Oct 6, 2013
    #15
  16. It's not that Jobs lived there; it's that that's where Apple Computer, Inc.
    was born.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Oct 6, 2013
    #16
  17. No presumably about it; it is that house and garage.
    [/QUOTE]
    Then supposedly comes out, too....
     
    John McWilliams, Oct 12, 2013
    #17
  18. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    The topic title says nothing about the garage, just the house. ;-)
     
    Your Name, Oct 12, 2013
    #18
  19. JF Mezei

    TaliesinSoft Guest

    But the garage is part of the house, not a separate detached building.
     
    TaliesinSoft, Oct 13, 2013
    #19
  20. JF Mezei

    Your Name Guest

    I know. It was a joke, which is why there's a winking smiley.
     
    Your Name, Oct 13, 2013
    #20
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