P2B-D Frequency Multiple Jumpers for > 600Mhz

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Al Franz, Jan 25, 2004.

  1. Al Franz

    Al Franz Guest

    Setting up an Asus P2B-D rev. 1.06 which can handle up to 1 Ghz Pentium
    III's. However the manual only shows the jumper settings for the "CPU
    Core:BUS Frequency Multiple" up to 600Mhz. Where can I find an updated
    settings table?
     
    Al Franz, Jan 25, 2004
    #1
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  2. Ever heard about multiplier lock?

    Stephan
     
    Stephan Grossklass, Jan 25, 2004
    #2
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  3. Al Franz

    Al Franz Guest

    I take it the Jumper settings for Bus Speed and Multipler then on the
    motherboard are irrelevant. Doesn't matter what I set them at?

    Would the P2B-D be able to support 100mhz and 133mhz Pentium III 1 GHz
    processors. Or do I have to use 100mhz processors to maximize the rev. 1.06
    board?
     
    Al Franz, Jan 25, 2004
    #3
  4. Al Franz

    P2B Guest

    The processor will ignore the multiplier jumpers - you can remove them
    if you like. To make up for that :) the motherboard will ignore the
    processor's Bus Speed request and use the jumper settings - so the FSB
    jumpers need to be set correctly.
    That depends on the PCB revision level. Rev 1.06 D02 and earlier support
    a maximum FSB of 112Mhz. Rev 1.06 D03 supports 133Mhz, but overclocks
    the PCI and AGP buses by 33%. Many AGP video cards will tolerate the AGP
    overclock, especially those with nVidia chipsets, but the PCI overclock
    causes problems with many devices. Fortunately it can be fixed:

    http://tipperlinne.com/p2b-ds150.htm

    Rev 1.06 D03 boards can be recognised by the yellow sticker near the AGP
    slot, as in the picture at the bottom of this page:

    http://tipperlinne.com/p2bmod

    HTH

    P2B
     
    P2B, Jan 26, 2004
    #4
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