P3b-f won't boot,strange beep code help...please?

Discussion in 'Asus' started by jcazz, Aug 29, 2007.

  1. jcazz

    jcazz Guest

    Greetings All,
    My desktop died!
    I have a p3b-f and a while back started rebooting occasionally in WinXP.
    At first I thought it was just Winblows. Then I started getting an error
    message on Bios post, warm and cold boot..."Hardware monitor found an
    error. Check power settings." I checked the settings and all seemed
    fine. A few weeks ago when I would shut down the system, XP would seem
    to shut down normally but then the PC would reboot, like I clicked on
    the RESTART button in Win. (I do not have Bios set to reboot on power
    failure)Sometimes on the reboot the Bois reported a 300mhz CPU instead
    of the 600 PIII and memory would be reported as 650MB instead of 1gig.

    That went on for a while until last a few days ago. The pc starting
    crashing in win and would suddenly reboot. When I tried to restart I got
    the beep for no video. After I hit the reset button I got a two tone
    beep in quick succession similar to a emergency vehicle . I tried it a
    gain tonight and the PC started but crashed when XP was loading and did
    the reboot routine. This happened twice. Then the two tone beep codes
    sounded like they were shot and dieing...very strange sound to describe.
    After trying to rest PSU I just get black screen with no post. If I let
    the PC sit a while with power switch on back in off position, the
    machine will post but OS will crash just before fully loading going
    thrrough same routine. Sometimes I can get to the OS welcome screen. I
    started unplugging CD's, Hd's and USB devices but no change.

    Please tell me what the weird beep code means... I tried asus site but
    can't find them.

    System is as follows;
    P3b-F
    PIII 600
    SuperMirco Full tower (4 case fans) plus CPU, video and PSU
    300 watt PSU
    2X WD Caviar (20g ?)
    Maxtor 15g
    Gforce AGP V6800 deluxe 32Mb
    Adaptec 2940? U2W ultra scsi
    Plextor UltraPlex wide CD
    Plextor Plexwriter 8/20
    SB audio
    Thanks in advance for any advice.
    john
     
    jcazz, Aug 29, 2007
    #1
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  2. jcazz

    RobV Guest

    [snip]

    The beep code is a "stock" beep code that means the CPU is failing, or
    more likely, the CPU is overheating. Here's a list of beep codes:

    http://bioscentral.com/beepcodes/awardbeep.htm

    Clean the dust out of the system, then use some canned air to clean the
    dust out of the CPU heatsink and fan.
    If it's not dusty, make sure the CPU fan is spinning at a proper speed
    and doesn't stop after a while. Check the heatsink mount. Is it loose?
    Check and clean as necessary the case fans and make sure they are
    spinning at proper speed and are clear of dust.

    Your older system just needs a thorough inspection and cleaning.
     
    RobV, Aug 29, 2007
    #2
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  3. jcazz schreef :
    To check the +5V line:
    switch on the PC, and measure between yellow (+5V) and black (ground)
    leads. The red wire carries the +12V line.

    On
    http://case-mods.linear1.org/case-mod-101-the-atx-power-switch-demystified/2/
    you will find an 24pin ATX power connector layout.
    to power up an ATX powersupply, short PS_On (green wire) to ground.

    Good luck.
    André
     
    André, PE1PQX, Aug 30, 2007
    #3
  4. jcazz

    jcazz Guest

    Thanks for your input Rob,
    I cleaned the system thoroughly and found an insect stuck in my video
    card fan. Now Bios is reporting 5V leg sometimes fluctuates between
    4.3-4.9. I think this is my problem now. The mobo light sometimes blinks
    then crashes. Could the fan on the graphics cause the fluctuation? IS
    this the PSU or mobo failure? I have a volt meter, how do I check 5v leg
    on psu?
    Thanks again
    John
     
    jcazz, Aug 30, 2007
    #4
  5. jcazz

    RobV Guest

    André, PE1PQX wrote:

    [snip]
    Got that a bit backwards there, Andre. Red is +5V, Yellow is +12V and
    black is, of course, ground. :)
     
    RobV, Aug 30, 2007
    #5
  6. jcazz

    RobV Guest

    jcazz wrote:

    [snip]

    Ah, the old insect in the fan problem, eh? ;-)

    Checking the voltage is easy with the link Andre gave for the ATX plug.
    However, he did get the +5V and +12V colors reversed. Yellow is +12V
    and red is +5V, with black being ground, of course. You can measure the
    voltage anywhere there is access to the red and yellow wires. You can
    get ground anywhere you can get to a black wire.

    Yes, the fluctuation is bad, and is going way lower than tolerance would
    allow. You may have a bad power supply, and/or bad capacitors: the big
    electrolytic capacitors near and around the CPU. If you see any kind of
    bulging on top of, or the sides of the caps, and/or light brown colored
    crud on top of, or the bottom of any of the caps, then they are bad and
    need replacing.
     
    RobV, Aug 30, 2007
    #6
  7. jcazz

    jcazz Guest

    Rob,

    Yes... The old fly in the fan gag... the oldest one in the Asus book!
    Now I know the beep codes for it.

    However, I did notice that the ATX PSU supply plug did have some brown
    scorch marks on it on the outside of the plastic. I don't know exactly
    which pins but believe it was around 21 or 22, looks like the 5v line.
    Could this mean the plug is making poor contact with mobo and thus
    reason for restart? I'll have to investigate further.

    Second... after complete tear down and rebuild last night (including
    opening PSU and cleaning) the machine ran great for over an hour on the
    bench. Multiple times I shut down and restarted and even ran a video
    without a problem. When I returned it to the house the computer run fine
    until I went on the internet. Maybe it's coincidence but most crashes
    occur on internet. I have another PSU but it only has plugs for 4 drives.
    Third... When the system was running in house the sound card would
    seem to power intermittently. I could hear it powering up and off. XP
    showed it in the device MGR as OK but never got sound.

    I built this PC when P3B-f was first released and it has run flawless
    for years. I once had a 300mhz running at 450 and never had CPU temp
    above 87 F. Since I installed Win XP it has been nothing but problems.
    I know it's time for a new machine but waiting for prices on DDR-3 to
    fall and Asus to work bugs out of P5K series.

    Thanks again for your help... any further comments, suggestions are
    appreciated.

    John
     
    jcazz, Aug 30, 2007
    #7
  8. jcazz

    RobV Guest

    Yes, those are +5V lines, and the signs of burning would indicate that
    there is a problem with the ATX connector. Since these are very high
    current lines, a poor connection can cause heat and oxidation of the
    plug and socket pins. To the best of your ability, clean the plug and
    socket pins and make sure they fit tight into the ATX socket. This is
    probably where the problems you are having lies.
    Besides the ATX connector, look at the capacitors as I mentioned.
    You're welcome, and good luck with whatever you decide to do.
     
    RobV, Aug 30, 2007
    #8
  9. jcazz

    RobV Guest

    RobV wrote:

    [snip]
    While browsing the other problems in the NG, someone else has a burnt
    ATX connector. The advice given to him was to do this:

    Go here:
    http://www.rwonline.com/reference-room/workbench/07_rwf_work_dec_21.shtml

    and, this is what's important for your problem:
    "Remove all the Molex plugs and treat the pins to a spritz of contact
    cleaner, or better yet, Caig Labs DeoxIT. Gently swab the pins to apply
    a thin film of this cleaner/preservative. Work the Molex plug back and
    forth over the pins to clean the contacts inside the plastic plug.
    Again, make sure the plug is properly inserted onto the pins. Fire up
    the rig before replacing the top, just to make sure everything is
    working properly before storing the equipment for the season."

    I would still suggest you get the oxidation off first, make sure the
    plug fits snugly, then use the items in the quote.
     
    RobV, Aug 30, 2007
    #9
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