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Phillips screw in back of Sun Ultra 30 computer, quite torn-up! :-)

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Barry L. Bond, Nov 4, 2006.

  1. Greetings!

    I have a single screw, within a black "plastic" configuration, that
    holds the metal left panel of my Sun Ultra 30 computer system.

    The screw went in too tight. And, in trying to remove it, I have
    really seriously "messed up" the phillips head of the screw. (Stripped
    didn't sound quite right to me, because, at least so far as I know, the
    threads along the length of the screw [within the system] are fine. It's
    the phillips head that is "stripped".)

    Last weekend, I put WD-40 on it. Tonight, I am not able to remove
    it.

    Two different screwdrivers just almost freely move in the (what was
    a) phillips hole, and there is not enough of the metal left in the
    phillips "hole shape" to grab the screw enough to turn it, and remove it.
    (I've tried needle-nose pliers, too, so far, it's not budging!)

    Does anyone have any suggestions for me?

    I recently had it open to place a second SCSI hard drive in the Sun.
    And, the hard drive is in, and it's working just fine. So, at the moment,
    I don't *critically* need to go inside it. But, I know the day will come
    when I will want to again. I'd like to get this screw removed, and then,
    replace it with a new one, and be more careful, in the future, to not get
    it in so tight.

    Thank you very much for any suggestions!

    Barry
     
    Barry L. Bond, Nov 4, 2006
    #1
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  2. Barry L. Bond

    jimp Guest

    Cut a slot in it.

    If that doesn't work, grind off the head.

    Oh, and buy some new screwdrivers.
     
    jimp, Nov 4, 2006
    #2
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  3. Barry L. Bond

    Huge Guest

    If it's accessible, hacksaw a slot in it (be careful where the metal
    filings go - you don't want them inside the system) and undo it with
    a standard screwdriver.

    If it's inaccessible, drill the head off with a drill bit slightly
    larger than the shank of the screw. Remove the panel, then undo the
    shank with a pair of pliers or similar.
     
    Huge, Nov 4, 2006
    #3
  4. Hi Jim!
    Ha ha! Boy are you correct!

    I actually normally use a drill, as an electric screwdriver. And,
    while I am definitely not a "super" DIY home-maintainer type, I have
    screwed many screws in, with that screwdriver, and when it was time to
    unscrew it, they all came loose without a problem!

    But, I have used the "nub" (or whatever it's called, I don't know the
    real terms for some of these things), in this screwdriver, for years, and
    it was getting just a little bit "beat up" already. It DEFINITELY is,
    now! :)

    I am using a different "nub" in that screwdriver, as well as a hand
    phillips screwdriver, in good shape. (And, needle-nose pliers, etc.!)

    Thank you for your kind assistance!

    Barry
     
    Barry L. Bond, Nov 4, 2006
    #4
  5. Howdy!
    It isn't. There is a black plastic "configuration" (I don't know
    what it's called) around this screw, and it "sticks up" above the screw
    head about half an inch. (You stick the screwdriver or needle-nose pliers
    through a hole on the end of this thing that sticks up to get to the head
    of the screw.)
    Ah... that is likely what I'll try, next. Thank you for your
    knowledge, in this area! I don't know whether I'll get to it, this
    weekend, or not, but I'll let you know if I have any other problems!

    Thank you again, kind Sir!

    Barry
     
    Barry L. Bond, Nov 4, 2006
    #5
  6. On Sat, 04 Nov 2006 15:27:56 GMT
    The contraption around the screw is meant to pass an anti-theft cable
    through. Doing so renders the screw inaccessible so the computer can't
    be removed and cannot be opened. Given that some Sun frame buffers
    cost several thousand dollars, locking the machine made sense.
     
    Stefaan A Eeckels, Nov 4, 2006
    #6
  7. Greetings!

    GREAT news! I went to Home Depot today, and I purchased a
    penetrating catalyst, as a "last-ditch" effort to try to get the poor
    screw out of the Sun before taking the drill to it!

    I sprayed it on. About five minutes later, it came loose!

    It's out! And, it turns out, I even had a screw that was the same
    size, and it's back in, and all is well!

    Thank you, everyone, for your suggestions! This problem is fixed,
    though!

    Barry
     
    Barry L. Bond, Nov 5, 2006
    #7
  8. Hi Stefaan!
    Ah! I wondered what the "contraption" was for! It looked like it
    had a purpose beyond just as a "placeholder" for the screw! That makes
    sense, I guess!

    Thank you!

    Barry
     
    Barry L. Bond, Nov 5, 2006
    #8
  9. Barry L. Bond

    maxodyne Guest

    Congratulations on your screw removal. It's after the fact now, so for
    the future benefit of everyone who has been following this thread:
    another way to remove tight or boogered Philips Head / Posi-Driv
    fasteners is with a hand-impact driver:

    http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item...1&group_ID=223&store=snapon-store&dir=catalog


    This tool takes a standard 3/8 drive screwdriver bit. When it is setup
    in removal mode, striking the end of the tool drives the screwdriver bit
    into the fastener head while at the same time imparting a
    counter-clockwise torque (or clockwise if that's what you want). So long
    as whatever the screw is fastening isn't too fragile, this tool will
    work where almost nothing else will. Sometimes it doesn't take all that
    much of a whack to make it work.

    This tool is invaluable if you happen to own cars or electronic devices
    made in Japan from the 60s to the 90s. Many of their Philips head
    screws seemed to be made out of really soft steel, and the heads would
    get scrambled rather quickly.

    For the paranoid, you can also use this tool to get things extra tight.
    Too tight, in fact.
     
    maxodyne, Nov 5, 2006
    #9
  10. Barry L. Bond

    maxodyne Guest

    Congratulations on your screw removal. It's after the fact now, so for
    the future benefit of everyone who has been following this thread:
    another way to remove tight or boogered Philips Head / Posi-Driv
    fasteners is with a hand-impact driver:

    http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item...1&group_ID=223&store=snapon-store&dir=catalog


    This tool takes a standard 3/8 drive screwdriver bit. When it is setup
    in removal mode, striking the end of the tool drives the screwdriver bit
    into the fastener head while at the same time imparting a
    counter-clockwise torque (or clockwise if that's what you want). So long
    as whatever the screw is fastening isn't too fragile, this tool will
    work where almost nothing else will. Sometimes it doesn't take all that
    much of a whack to make it work.

    This tool is invaluable if you happen to own cars or electronic devices
    made in Japan from the 60s to the 90s. Many of their Philips head
    screws seemed to be made out of really soft steel, and the heads would
    get scrambled rather quickly.

    For the paranoid, you can also use this tool to get things extra tight.
    Too tight, in fact.
     
    maxodyne, Nov 5, 2006
    #10
  11. Hi, Maxodyne!
    Wow! Striking the tool, with the bit inserted into the head, neat
    idea! I appreciate your indicating such success with this tool! As soon
    as I can spare a little beyond $50, I'll likely look into getting it!

    Thank you!

    Barry
     
    Barry L. Bond, Nov 11, 2006
    #11
  12. Not sure I'd hit an Ultra with a hammer! I used an impact driver with
    great success when working on early Japanese motorcycles - the screws
    quickly got rusted in the British climate.

    Maybe some kludge using super-glue? ...next time :)

    TJ
     
    Triple Jumper, Dec 12, 2006
    #12
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