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[PIC] New electronic projects site (Schematics only at the moment)

Discussion in 'Embedded' started by William at MyBlueRoom, Feb 27, 2006.

  1. Here's my list of current PIC projects on my web site
    www.myblueroom.com, currently only the schematics are posted but I will
    post descriptions and source code asap.


    Armadillo: (iButton Door Lock) Preview, Incomplete
    PIC 16F87 or 16F628A based iButton, keypad and remote controlled door
    lock, H-Bridge can drive 1 small motor or 2 relays, 2 wire
    communications option with host computer will be added.

    Beetle: (Addressable Temperature Sender RS485)
    RS485 long range ~4000' remote temperature sender, can be fully
    automatic or manual, industrial grade Centigrade temperature IC and PIC
    12C508, 1wire option (www.ibutton.com)

    Cricket: (Addressable RS485 or RS232 Thermostat with IR)
    My most popular design, (my favourite too) PIC16F628A
    RS485 or RS232 multizone up to 9 using DS18S20 type Centigrade
    temperature ICs, single relay can control basic HVAC (see furnace
    option in schematic to control AC, Fan & Heat) can be expanded to 6
    relays (heat-pump) using my Ladybug Automation Controller, other
    options include keypad, IR remote & 1wire, 8 zone LEDs plus 2 seven
    segment LED displays on only 8 I/O pins (Charlieplexing)

    Emu: (RS485 3A H-Bridge Motor Controller)
    PIC 16F628A Uses a L298 H-Bridge to control 2 low voltage motors (or
    other small loads) 1 stepper motor or 4 relays, has 4 switch inputs,
    Schematic will be updated to support an IR option & iButton mode (RTCC)

    Fox: (RS232 / RS485 programmable converter with a iButton
    reader/writer)
    PIC 16CE674 iButton mode can disable the RS485 port when in use
    (programmable) or used in a security mode.

    Ladybug: (RS232 & RS485, 6 Relay & 4 input + iButton Automation
    Controller)
    PIC 16F876 or 18F2525 Multiuse controller
    2 Hardware UARTs (16F876 + MAX3110E) for fast reliable serial
    communications
    6 Relays (One with open collector option)
    4 Digital / Switch inputs (One can be used with 10bit ADC (0-15V)
    1 iButton / 1wire port
    Software Real time clock / calendar with 24hr Supercap backup
    Can be used standalone or paired with a Cricket Thermostat to
    provide 6 extra HVAC relays.. with ICD2 port option. Looking into
    TW-523 X10 control using INPUTS 2,3,4

    Owl: (5 Zone Security System)
    PIC 12F629 uses 1wire DS2401 serial numbers (Very Secure compared to
    resistor based alarm systems) was designed to show what can be done
    with an 8 pin microcontroller.

    Snake: (Dual Dice)
    PIC 12C508 very simple to build, nice beginners project.

    Yetti: (RS485 HiPower 30A Relay & 1 switch)
    PIC 12C508 The address is hard coded in to PIC. Good for controlling a
    sprinker system, Open Collector option.

    Zebra: (RS485 Clock)
    PIC 16F628 Six digit clock with RS485, IR & Relay, again the display
    is Charlieplexed to keep the parts count way down.

    Looking for options and comments. (any help in PCB design & code
    snippits would me most welcome)
     
    William at MyBlueRoom, Feb 27, 2006
    #1
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  2. William at MyBlueRoom

    Chans Guest

    It's wonderful. No words to appreciate your work. Did you use ORCAD for
    the capture design?
     
    Chans, Mar 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. William at MyBlueRoom

    CBFalconer Guest

    What is wonderful? What work? What design? See my sig. below to
    include context and make your postings intelligible.

    --
    "If you want to post a followup via groups.google.com, don't use
    the broken "Reply" link at the bottom of the article. Click on
    "show options" at the top of the article, then click on the
    "Reply" at the bottom of the article headers." - Keith Thompson
    More details at: <http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/>
    Also see <http://www.safalra.com/special/googlegroupsreply/>
     
    CBFalconer, Mar 1, 2006
    #3
  4. Thank you for the wonderful, and yes it's OrCAD. New content goes up
    daily, it's a fair amout of work just setting up the site. Source code
    is next when the schematics have passed all the usenet scrutiny.

    Bill
    http://www.myblueroom.com
     
    William at MyBlueRoom, Mar 2, 2006
    #4
  5. William at MyBlueRoom

    Tim Guest

    William,

    I wish I could drive multiplexed LEDs the way you do!!!

    I think you need to do more research for the Zebra Clock and the
    Cricket Thermostat display interface...
    Hint- You'll need separate digit and segment port bits...
    But good to see that someone's putting stuff out there!

    ~Tim
     
    Tim, Mar 5, 2006
    #5
  6. William at MyBlueRoom

    kevinjwhite Guest

    What's wrong with it?

    It is an unusual way of doing the multiplexing I agree but very
    economical on control lines - it uses the ability of the port to drive
    low, high or be open.

    Maxim has an app note about this approach

    http://www.maxim-ic.com/appnotes.cfm/appnote_number/1880

    kevin
     
    kevinjwhite, Mar 5, 2006
    #6
  7. It's not my invention. It's called charlieplexing, you do need bit
    settable tristate ports.
     
    William at MyBlueRoom, Mar 5, 2006
    #7
  8. William at MyBlueRoom

    Tim Guest

    William,

    My Apologies!
    With my quick first look, things looked very strange! I've never seen
    that done before. It's actually a pretty cool way to save ports. I'd
    expect that the code is a little less straight forward tho... I'll
    have to give it a try. (you can learn something new all the time... if
    you take the time)

    ~Tim
     
    Tim, Mar 23, 2006
    #8
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