Problem with P4P800 Deluxe and P4M 1.8

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Stormgiant, Sep 16, 2004.

  1. Stormgiant

    Stormgiant Guest

    Hi there,

    Just got a used P4M 1.8 512Kb cache to use on my second rig and the
    BIOS ( 1017.004 23/06/2004 ) doesn't recognize it write.
    It appers as a P4 1200 ( 12x100 ) with minimum 1.575v to choose and
    memoria 3:4 divisor only.
    Shouldn't it recognize as a P4 2400 ( 12x200 ) and give lower vcore
    options ?

    It was a easy deal, no need for a fancy cpu on my second rig.

    Thanks for any help,

    -------------------------------------------------------
    Stormgiant

    Asus P4P800-Deluxe
    [email protected] FSB261 on WC
    512MB Kingston BH-5 @DDR522 2-2-2-5 3.45V
    Power Color ATi 9800XT 520/410
    -------------------------------------------------------
     
    Stormgiant, Sep 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. Stormgiant

    Paul Guest

    Over on Abxzone, they use P4-M for massive overclocking experiments.
    All the P4-M (regardless of rated speed) default to 12x100 when
    installed in a desktop board, which is one of their better qualities.
    People crank the clock to 300MHz, and reach 3.6GHz with them. Of course,
    you need a particular stepping and speed grade to make that happen.
    One of the main reasons for doing this, is it allows running the
    memory at ridiculously high clocks, so if you buy some PC4000+ memory,
    you can get the mileage from it. The mobiles also run reasonably cool.

    So, go into the BIOS and set the CPU clock to whatever you want,
    and see how far it will go. If you don't have very good memory,
    set the memory speed to DDR266, which is the 3:2 (CPU:Memclock)
    ratio, so the memory can have a chance of staying in spec. If you
    did manage to get it running with CPU=300MHz clock (FSB1200), then
    a memory setting of DDR266 will actually be running the memory at
    300*(2/3)=200MHz memory clock, or DDR400 rate. So, a setting of
    "DDR266" in the BIOS, plus some PC3200 memory, will allow you to
    determine just how far the CPU can go.

    Have fun,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 17, 2004
    #2
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