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Problems with with images on wide screen Wide Screen

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by William Rail, Oct 31, 2004.

  1. William Rail

    William Rail Guest

    I have just bought a new laptop with a 17 inch wide LCD and ATI
    Mobility Radeon 9600 pro. graphics. Great resolution and landscapes,
    but fat faced portraits are a problem. OK if I rescale the images
    before working on them, as long as I remember to revert them before
    printing (otherwise I get thin faced prints), and it would be better
    to be able to view the finished job before printing

    Mfrs help desk can't offer a solution, but I would like to be able to
    adjust the screen output as appropriate to make things simpler, even
    if it means buying an external adapter (if there is such a thing.)

    Using 'settings' only produces a string of 'letterbox'
    resolutions, and doesn't allow me manually increase the pixel
    height.My OS is Windows XP

    Anybody solved this problem and can help?

    William Rail
     
    William Rail, Oct 31, 2004
    #1
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  2. William Rail

    J. Clarke Guest

    What application are you using? It sounds like it's assuming a 4:3 aspect
    ratio and scaling to full screen.
     
    J. Clarke, Oct 31, 2004
    #2
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  3. -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Hi William,

    I am using a HP Pavilion zd7010us with a WXGA 17" display, and the
    only time I have seen what you are talking about is if I am *not*
    running in 'native' resolution mode.

    Ciao . . . C.Joseph

    That which a man buys too cheaply . . .
    ~ He esteems too lightly



    William Rail wrote:

    | I have just bought a new laptop with a 17 inch wide LCD and ATI
    | Mobility Radeon 9600 pro. graphics. Great resolution and
    | landscapes, but fat faced portraits are a problem. OK if I rescale
    | the images before working on them, as long as I remember to revert
    | them before printing (otherwise I get thin faced prints), and it
    | would be better to be able to view the finished job before printing
    |
    |
    | Mfrs help desk can't offer a solution, but I would like to be able
    | to adjust the screen output as appropriate to make things simpler,
    | even if it means buying an external adapter (if there is such a
    | thing.)
    |
    | Using 'settings' only produces a string of 'letterbox' resolutions,
    | and doesn't allow me manually increase the pixel height.My OS is
    | Windows XP
    |
    | Anybody solved this problem and can help?
    |
    | William Rail
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.2.2 (MingW32)

    iD8DBQFBhXPy6bFq6mlbLOwRAn97AJ9qq7WkHIl06ENJRmXL86ev466ovQCfVFgi
    ygU12zA8+z0c9n3V4jjdsaA=
    =uJbg
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
     
    C.Joseph Drayton, Oct 31, 2004
    #3
  4. William Rail

    Quaoar Guest

    It is not clear what "settings" you are using. The only settings that
    count are the display adapter settings: Display properties control
    panel, or right-click the desktop, select Properties, Settings tab.
    Select from Display dropdown: Notebook LCD (some native resolution here)
    on Mobility Radeon 9600 Pro. Select the Screen resolution slider to the
    native resolution of the display selected above. Note that the
    resolution should be in the ratio of 16:9 and not 4:3. Common WUXGA is
    1920x1200, WXGA is 1366x768; it is likely that one of these is the
    native LCD resolution.

    Q
     
    Quaoar, Nov 1, 2004
    #4
  5. William Rail

    Hierophant Guest

    |
    | | >I have just bought a new laptop with a 17 inch wide LCD and ATI
    | > Mobility Radeon 9600 pro. graphics. Great resolution and landscapes,
    | > but fat faced portraits are a problem. OK if I rescale the images
    | > before working on them, as long as I remember to revert them before
    | > printing (otherwise I get thin faced prints), and it would be better
    | > to be able to view the finished job before printing
    | >
    | > Mfrs help desk can't offer a solution, but I would like to be able to
    | > adjust the screen output as appropriate to make things simpler, even
    | > if it means buying an external adapter (if there is such a thing.)
    | >
    | > Using 'settings' only produces a string of 'letterbox'
    | > resolutions, and doesn't allow me manually increase the pixel
    | > height.My OS is Windows XP
    | >
    | > Anybody solved this problem and can help?
    | >
    | > William Rail
    | >
    |
    | It is not clear what "settings" you are using. The only settings that
    | count are the display adapter settings: Display properties control
    | panel, or right-click the desktop, select Properties, Settings tab.
    | Select from Display dropdown: Notebook LCD (some native resolution here)
    | on Mobility Radeon 9600 Pro. Select the Screen resolution slider to the
    | native resolution of the display selected above. Note that the
    | resolution should be in the ratio of 16:9 and not 4:3. Common WUXGA is
    | 1920x1200, WXGA is 1366x768; it is likely that one of these is the
    | native LCD resolution.
    |

    It's taken care of. I accidentally sent email instead of replying on board.
    It was "scale image to panel size" setting in the advanced display
    properties.
     
    Hierophant, Nov 1, 2004
    #5
  6. William Rail

    Quaoar Guest

    Ok, just to clarify, you don't want to scale image to panel. The native
    resolution does not require scaling and will fill the screen. If that
    box is unchecked you should see a black border around the smaller image
    if the display is not set to its native resolution.

    Q
     
    Quaoar, Nov 1, 2004
    #6
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