Recommended backup software?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Bob Blaylock, Jul 5, 2007.

  1. Bob Blaylock

    Bob Blaylock Guest

    I'm looking for recommendations for backup software to run under MacOS
    X 10.4.x on a Power Macintosh G4 MDD. I want to be able to backup my
    entire hard drive to DVD-Rs, and preferably be able to produce a
    bootable DVD from which I can boot, if necessary, to do a full restore
    from these backups?

    I've already figured out that Retrospect Express 5.1 doesn't seem to
    work very well at all on this system, perhaps because it is too
    obsolete. Before I consider paying for an upgrade to Retrospect
    Express, I'd like to know what other, possibly better choices there are.
     
    Bob Blaylock, Jul 5, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Bob Blaylock

    Frank Graves Guest

    SuperDuper is excellent. And yes go ahead and backup to an external
    hard drive. I use it with my G5 iMac and once it is set up (very
    simple) you hardly know it is there. Cost is $27.95 which is worth
    every penny.

    Frank
     
    Frank Graves, Jul 5, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Bob Blaylock

    The New Guy Guest

    Is there anything that can just backup file 1, 2 and 3 without
    anything else? I've used Retrospect and Silverkeeper. Neither seems
    to do that. Did I miss something?
     
    The New Guy, Jul 5, 2007
    #3
  4. I thoroughly concur.

    SuperDuper! does everything I want easily, quickly, and
    unobtrusively on my PPC iMac.
     
    Alec McKenzie, Jul 5, 2007
    #4
  5. Bob Blaylock

    Tim McNamara Guest

    Well, you can always just drag and drop those files to another drive, or
    burn them to a CD or DVD. No backup software needed. Where backup
    software comes in handy is doing automatic incremental backups on a
    daily basis but not necessary to just make an archival copy of a file.
     
    Tim McNamara, Jul 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Bob Blaylock

    Marko Vihoma Guest

    You can open a terminal and command `tar cjf backup.tar.bz2 file1 file2
    file3`, without the backslashes... This will create a bzip2'd
    (compressed with bzip2) tar package. If You omit j it will only tar it
    without compressing and if You swap j with z it will create a gzip'd
    (compressed with gzip) tar file.

    Read tar(1) (aka read tar's man page, `man tar` in a terminal).

    Sorry if I spelled things too simply, but I don't know Your level of
    expertise with Unix commands :)
     
    Marko Vihoma, Jul 5, 2007
    #6
  7. Bob Blaylock

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    Interesting. So I do mainly magazine articles for a living. I keep
    copies of my in-process stories on the HD and on a flash drive. About
    every 10 days or so, I get around to buring a DVD of the mission
    critical stuff, mainly my documents folder and e-mail folder. I also
    have the non-standard programs (VLC, NewsWatcher, etc) on my flash
    drive. I figure that I can use the DVD and the original disks to rebuild
    stuff if teh HD starts going bonkers.
    Would you say this is a good strategy given what I want and my
    assumptions? Should I be saving other things to either the DVD or the
    flash drive?
     
    Kurt Ullman, Jul 5, 2007
    #7
  8. Bob Blaylock

    Ian Gregory Guest

    It sounds fairly reasonable. Personally I back up the whole of my
    home directory fairly regularly (not as regularly as I should) by
    rsyncing it to an external hard drive which I connect to the system
    only while I am actually doing a backup. I don't bother backing up
    anything else. In the event of an internal drive failure it would
    take me the best part of a day to install Mac OS X on a replacement
    drive, rsync my home directory from the external drive, and read
    through my notes, downloading and installing applications that I
    need.

    At some point I should burn a copy of my home directory to DVD and
    keep it off site.

    Ian
     
    Ian Gregory, Jul 5, 2007
    #8
  9. Bob Blaylock

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    Excuse my ignorance (or not as long as answer the question-grin)
    what constitutes the home directory?
     
    Kurt Ullman, Jul 5, 2007
    #9
  10. Bob Blaylock

    Warren Oates Guest

    <
    In OS X it's /Users/warren (in my case). Or /Users/you, in your case. In
    Linux it's something like /home/warren or /home/you. It's where, in a
    Unixish system, individual users keep the stuff that's specific to their
    accounts.
     
    Warren Oates, Jul 5, 2007
    #10
  11. <
    The home directory is the directory/folder inside the users folder that
    corresponds to the currently logged-in user. It's icon is that of a
    house.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jul 5, 2007
    #11
  12. Bob Blaylock

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    Thanks to all for this information. Is it safe to assume that this
    will (or will not) fit on a DVD? Do I still need to get an external HD?
     
    Kurt Ullman, Jul 5, 2007
    #12
  13. Bob Blaylock

    The New Guy Guest

    Exactly. I'll have to review Retrospect and Silverkeeper. Maybe I
    was asleep at the wheel.
     
    The New Guy, Jul 5, 2007
    #13
  14. Bob Blaylock

    Philo D Guest

    In a Finder view, click on the house icon, then type command-I (Get
    Info). Read the size. Compare that to the size of a DVD. This will
    vary a lot, depending on what you have put there.
     
    Philo D, Jul 5, 2007
    #14
  15. Bob Blaylock

    The New Guy Guest

    Very lame, very lame.....:) Its like a different language.
     
    The New Guy, Jul 5, 2007
    #15
  16. Bob Blaylock

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    In a Finder view, click on the house icon, then type command-I (Get
    Info). Read the size. Compare that to the size of a DVD. This will
    vary a lot, depending on what you have put there.[/QUOTE]

    Says 8.9 GB and the DVD says 4.7. I am assuming that this has no
    function to spread it across multiple DVDs (g). Bummer.
     
    Kurt Ullman, Jul 5, 2007
    #16
  17. Bob Blaylock

    Kurt Ullman Guest

    I can live with that. Thanks again to all.

    K
     
    Kurt Ullman, Jul 5, 2007
    #17
  18. <
    It all depends on how much data you have stored in your home folder.
    Except for some default folders, sample files, and application-created
    preferences and stuff in the library folder, everything in the home
    folder is what you put in it.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Jul 5, 2007
    #18
  19. Says 8.9 GB and the DVD says 4.7. I am assuming that this has no
    function to spread it across multiple DVDs (g). Bummer.[/QUOTE]

    So compress it, dear lisa, dear lisa...
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Jul 5, 2007
    #19
  20. Bob Blaylock

    KJ Guest

    One backup program for CD/DVD not yet mentioned is DropDMG.
    http://c-command.com/dropdmg/

    DropDMG is great at what it does, but for backups over then network or
    external hard drives, just use the UNIX underpinnings available
    through the terminal.
     
    KJ, Jul 5, 2007
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.