replacing bad caps?

Discussion in 'Abit' started by Thomas A. Horsley, Oct 18, 2005.

  1. I have a bunch of 1500uF caps left over from when I repaired another
    motherboard, and I've got a AT7-MAX which I just noticed has a few bulging
    and/or leaking caps on it. Some of them are marked 1000uF 10v, and some are
    1000uF 6.3v. There appears to be plenty of room for the larger 1500uF caps
    on the board. Is there any reason it would be a bad idea to use the higher
    rated caps I have on hand to replace the bad ones on this AT7?

    (Remarkably, the board seems to work fine, but I was blowing dust out of it,
    and noticed the northbridge cooler fan wasn't rotating, then when I got it
    out of the case to fix that, I noticed the caps - that will teach me to
    clean dust out of computers :).
    --email: icbm: Delray Beach, FL |
    <URL:http://home.att.net/~Tom.Horsley> Free Software and Politics <<==+
     
    Thomas A. Horsley, Oct 18, 2005
    #1
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  2. Thomas A. Horsley

    Gary Guest

    No.

    Providing the voltage rating is equal or higher and that they're rated for
    the high temperatures they'll no doubt be subjected to, they'll be fine :)
     
    Gary, Oct 18, 2005
    #2
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  3. Providing the voltage rating is equal or higher and that they're rated for
    Seems to be true :). I got the caps replaced, the 10,471 cables from the
    front panel and drives and wot-not plugged back in, and it is booting and
    running again. (I'm always amazed when I do something like this and don't
    fry everything - I guess I don't have an excuse to build that new machine
    now...).
    --email: icbm: Delray Beach, FL |
    <URL:http://home.att.net/~Tom.Horsley> Free Software and Politics <<==+
     
    Thomas A. Horsley, Oct 20, 2005
    #3
  4. When I used to build stereo power supplies 35 years ago I noticed this:
    on a circuit

    O----R --- ---R--- ---R --- ---O
    input | | | output
    C C C
    | | |
    o-------------------------------O

    when you feed a set voltage sawtooth or half-sinewave into it you will
    get different output voltage: the bigger the caps, the higher the
    voltage - within limits obviously, and also depending on draw. But I had
    the dc increase from 15V to 20V by using bigger caps - quite a bit,
    expecially for some of those early germanium transistors.

    But I am sure your psu is NOT delivering sawtooth to the mobo (LOL)
    so you probably won't run into this problem. AFAIK those caps are there
    to stabilize voltage, not to smooth it out.

    Still, I'd like to check if that mobo were mine. Will your bios tell
    you?

    -Peter
     
    Peter Huebner, Oct 27, 2005
    #4
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