reset battery or new battery

Discussion in 'Dell' started by JD, Feb 14, 2006.

  1. JD

    JD Guest

    I have a dell inspirion 2650 that is three years old. It stays plugged on
    my desk most of the time. Tonight I went portable and the battery only
    lasted about 15 minutes. It seemed to go a lot longer than that.
    Is there a way I can reset the battery so it takes a full charge, or do I
    need to get a new battery?
    TIA
    JD
     
    JD, Feb 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. JD

    Ben Myers Guest

    Three years is usually pushing the limit on notebook battery life. Replace.

    .... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Feb 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. JD

    Jay B Guest

    you will need a new battery. get it cheaper from ebay.

    if you want to keep the laptop plugged into power all the time, then
    pull the battery until it is needed.
     
    Jay B, Feb 14, 2006
    #3
  4. JD

    answers Guest

    Before spending any money, completely discharge your battery and then
    charge it up again.

    Eventhough, it has been three years you said you have it plugged in
    most of the time so it would not have worked the battery a lot.
    Li-ions dont need to be recalibrated this way but the
    electronics/circuits within the battery pack would benefit from this
    type of recalibration. As they tend to screw things up even if the
    battery cells are fine.

    If this fails to get you battery going then yes you may have to buy a
    new battery.

    Good luck.

    Battery Wizard
    http://www.ComputerBatteries.co.uk
     
    answers, Feb 14, 2006
    #4
  5. JD

    SLLD Guest

    ---- pull the battery until it is needed. ----

    Will this void the warrenty or cause overvoltage?
    I have a Averatec 6120.
    Tnx
     
    SLLD, Feb 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Ah, another user finds out what the consequences are of leaving his
    expensive lithium battery in his laptop when it is continuously run on
    AC power for long periods of time.

    The battery is probably toast. If you get a new battery (for
    traveling), consider leaving it out of the laptop when you are on AC
    power and instead spening $30 (or less) on a UPS.
     
    Barry Watzman, Feb 14, 2006
    #6
  7. BS. If he hadn't left the battery in the computer when it was not being
    used, but rather was being either overcharged and/or over heated, it
    would be essentially as good as new. Lithium based batteries are
    extremely stable, and if not abused can last the better part of a decade
    or even longer. But they won't take either long-term overcharging or
    long-term overheating.
     
    Barry Watzman, Feb 14, 2006
    #7
  8. NO.
     
    Barry Watzman, Feb 14, 2006
    #8
  9. Why is it an issue? I would have assumed that

    1) A battery would be safe when charged with a low current.
    2) The charger would sense the charge state and reduce the current to a
    low rate.

    OR

    If the battery must not be charged when full, then the charging
    circuitry would remove all power to the battery.

    It seems hard to believe that is not a design flaw, if that is allowed
    to damage a battery.

    As someone else said, at 3 years old, the battery is quite old anyway.


    --
    Dave K

    http://www.southminster-branch-line.org.uk/

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually. The month is
    always written in 3 letters (e.g. Jan, not January etc)
     
    Dave (from the UK), Feb 14, 2006
    #9
  10. At least part of the problem, and perhaps most of it, is heat which
    comes from the laptop (CPU, disk drive, power supply, etc.) rather than
    from the battery, but to which the battery is "exposed".

    But that fact notwithstanding, it's just about certain from annecdotal
    evidence that many if not most models of laptops and batteries still
    also manage to apply enough of a charge to fully charged batteries to do
    additional damage over long periods of time (months, years).

    In the real world, things don't necessarily work the way that you would
    think that they would in an ideal world.
     
    Barry Watzman, Feb 14, 2006
    #10
  11. That does make sense.
    It is very easy to cut the current to *very* small values, but the heat
    is an issue I would accept it more difficult to solve, and perhaps not
    soluble given you can't put much thermal insulation in a package the
    size of a laptop.

    dave


    --
    Dave K

    http://www.southminster-branch-line.org.uk/

    Please note my email address changes periodically to avoid spam.
    It is always of the form: month-year@domain. Hitting reply will work
    for a couple of months only. Later set it manually. The month is
    always written in 3 letters (e.g. Jan, not January etc)
     
    Dave (from the UK), Feb 15, 2006
    #11
  12. Yeah, what he said, but bring it up in the BIOS or DOS or something
    that won't shut down automatically when the battery controller thinks
    it's reached {5,10}percent...

    But at three years it's probably time for a new battery.
     
    William P.N. Smith, Feb 16, 2006
    #12
  13. JD

    answers Guest

    Yes, yes.... you are all right/correct. It may be time for a new
    battery. All I was trying to emphasize was, if you can get another 6
    months to a years use out of that battery then great. You have some
    time to shop around and get a new battery. No rush.

    If that fails then a new battery is needed right away.

    Just one of those things to try before giving up.....

    Regards
    Battery Wizard
    http://www.ComputerBatteries.co.uk
     
    answers, Feb 20, 2006
    #13
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