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serial or parallel direct cable connection without direct connect on one computer...

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by lab, Nov 14, 2005.

  1. lab

    lab Guest

    Hi.


    I have a winxp pc and a win98 laptop without floppy, cd etc, and the
    windows 98 does not have direct connect progam installed, with no way
    to install it.


    I have a serial cable to connect the two, but is there any program that

    can remote initiate a connection like laplink could do in the days of
    DOS? I can't install it on the laptop, in fact I can't do much with
    the laptop until I can find some way to put data on it.


    I would be very grateful for any suggestions.


    Thanks,
    lab.
     
    lab, Nov 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. Try buying a usb external CD or floppy. If 98 won't recognize that then
    there were many parallel port external CD-Rom units out there as well. Also
    you might try getting a PCMCIA one of either type. Another thing you could
    do is pull the drive, and put it in an external USB unit that connects to
    the XP box. Then copy the 98 install cd into a directory. Then put back
    the drive and use that to install the direct connect software.
     
    Richard Johnson, Nov 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. lab

    Andrew Guest

    : Hi.

    : I have a winxp pc and a win98 laptop without floppy, cd etc, and the
    : windows 98 does not have direct connect progam installed, with no way
    : to install it.

    : I have a serial cable to connect the two, but is there any program that

    : can remote initiate a connection like laplink could do in the days of
    : DOS? I can't install it on the laptop, in fact I can't do much with
    : the laptop until I can find some way to put data on it.

    : I would be very grateful for any suggestions.

    Does the Win98 computer have an Ethernet (network) card? Assuming the
    XP computer also does, you can connect the two computers with a
    Crossover cable, a special ethernet cable used to make a simple
    network without a router. You need to assign an IP address to each
    computer (for example 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.3). Of course Win98
    will probably want to reboot with each little change.

    Andrew
    --
    ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
    *******************************************************************
    ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
    ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
    *******************************************************************
     
    Andrew, Nov 15, 2005
    #3
  4. Find an old version of laplink (for MS-DOS, not windows ... I'm talking
    early 1990's software here). It had a way of "self-installing" after
    you used DEBUG to enter a very short binary program by hand in hex on
    the keyboard (less than 20 bytes, and when you inititate the process on
    the "host", it tells you exactly, keystroke for keystroke, what to enter
    on the client). It then "bootstraps itself" and you end up with a
    mid-level file transfer system between the two machines.

    The other option is to temporarily remove the hard drive from the laptop
    and use another PC to transfer files onto it.

    Serial is going to be hopelessly slow, you need to upgrade to an
    Ethernet network interconnection.
     
    Barry Watzman, Nov 15, 2005
    #4
  5. He says he has no floppy, no CD and ... VERY IMPORTANTLY ... no way to
    install DCC, which implies that the cabinet files are not on the PC.
    That precludes almost everything (even plugging in a network card will
    want access to either a Windows 98 CD or the equivalent cabinet files),
    and leaves him very few options, one of which is removing the hard drive
    and adding the necessary files with the hard drive connected to another
    PC. Another option, which I discussed, is an old MS-DOS version of
    laplink, which could "self boot" onto a PC that didn't have it.
     
    Barry Watzman, Nov 15, 2005
    #5
  6. lab

    lab Guest

    Thanks for the suggestions, people.

    Unfortunately, it's old, so no usb.

    Ethernet on laptop, not PC. Though about getting a cheapo PCMCIA
    modem card and uploading, downloading required stuff, but it would have
    to be truely plug and play, as no drivers can be installed.

    Richard's ideas sound expensive, I don't really want to buy a CD drive
    just to do this, and this USB laptop hard drive adaptor thing sounds
    pricey too.

    You're right Barry, the cab files aren't on the hard disk (grr).

    I don't think laptop hard drive are compatible with IDE, but I'll open
    it up to check.

    Serial cables all I got, anyway I don't think the self install laplink
    worked with parallel, only serial. Slow isn't a problem, although I
    guess we're talking floppy disc speed!...

    The laplink route sounds the best. I'll have to boot the winxp pc into
    dos and try it.

    I'll let you know how it goes.

    Thanks again.
    lab.
     
    lab, Nov 16, 2005
    #6
  7. lab

    Andrew Guest

    : Thanks for the suggestions, people.

    : Unfortunately, it's old, so no usb.

    : Ethernet on laptop, not PC. Though about getting a cheapo PCMCIA
    : modem card and uploading, downloading required stuff, but it would have
    : to be truely plug and play, as no drivers can be installed.

    : Richard's ideas sound expensive, I don't really want to buy a CD drive
    : just to do this, and this USB laptop hard drive adaptor thing sounds
    : pricey too.

    Not necessarily. Where I live, you can buy a USB enclosure for 2.5"
    drives for about $30, maybe less. Where I live, Fry's Electronics
    sometimes even has them on sale for free (about $25 plus a rebate) now
    and again. The trick with an older laptop might be actually getting
    the hard drive out.

    As to the network approach: maybe you are lucky and TCP/IP is already
    installed in Windows 98 on it? Then you might be able to assign an IP
    manually to the NIC and not need the Win98 cab files? If that works,
    you could surely find a way to get a NIC card on the desktop
    computer. Even find a USB to ethernet adaptor or something like that.

    Andrew
    --
    ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
    *******************************************************************
    ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
    ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
    *******************************************************************
     
    Andrew, Nov 16, 2005
    #7
  8. If you have ethernet on the laptop, then get a card for the desktop for
    $5, or get a USB to Ethernet adapter for the desktop for about $10 to
    $15. That is clearly the way to go.

    ***ALL*** laptop hard drives can be connected to a desktop IDE port (40
    (or 80) conductor IDE hard drive cable) with a $5 adapter:

    http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=HD-108&cat=HDD

    You add the desired files (the .CAB files if there is room for them) on
    the desktop, then put the drive back into the laptop.

    Windows XP doesn't boot into DOS. You will need another machine running
    Windows 98.
     
    Barry Watzman, Nov 16, 2005
    #8
  9. You can buy a USB enclosure for a 2.5" hard drive for $12 to $15. There
    are hundreds of them on E-Bay, they usually sell real cheap (99 cents,
    sometimes) with very high shipping charges relative to what they weigh
    ($10 to $15 shipping). This is the seller's way of "cheating" E-Bay out
    of it's commission (E-Bay gets a % of the selling price but not of the
    shipping charge).

    Functionally, this is equivalent to using a laptop drive IDE adapter.
    It's a bit more expensive, it's more convenient, it's a bit less
    compatible if there are any "abnormalities" in the drive setup, but it
    would work in probably more than 95% of cases.
     
    Barry Watzman, Nov 16, 2005
    #9
  10. lab

    lab Guest

    I'm gonna go with the ethernet option - they are cheap, and at least
    getting ethernet for the desktop will be useful in the future. I'll
    have to pay out for the dable, but it should be a $10 dollar cost, or
    thereabouts.

    WinXP (and WinME?) don't do DOS (but you can use a bootable CD to get
    DOS.)

    Thanks for clearing up the ebay thing, I always wondered why the
    shipping was so obviously rigged. I just stay away from obvious rip
    offs, I guess other people don't!
     
    lab, Nov 16, 2005
    #10
  11. lab

    lars Guest

    Don't you have Norton Commander?
    It is great for that sort of thing as long as
    you can boot both machines to Dos.

    Connect the two computers with laplink
    cables, serial is what you need this time
    ..
    Start NC on the one where you can install it.
    Go to "Link", set up which port you use
    and that this machine will be "master",
    follow the instructions on screen and hit
    the "clone" button.

    That will transfer enough of NC to the other
    machine to initiate the link.

    You need NC 4 or 5. The earliest ones won't do.
    (You can actually trim NC 4 down to fit on a
    floppy if you have to.)
    In the Dos days Norton Commander was a man's
    best friend.



    Lars
    Stockholm
     
    lars, Nov 16, 2005
    #11
  12. lab

    lab Guest

    I ended up using laplink. It was hidden on the laptop, so I am moving
    the direct connect cab over. Norton commander is great, I'm sure, but
    I already have laplink.

    Thanks for the suggestion Lars.

    I guess for anyone else in this situation, remote install with laplink
    or norton commander is the best option, though you need a serial cable
    (hopefully not too expensive). Didn't work, the remote install with
    laplink when I tried it, but hopefully anyone else will have better
    luck.
     
    lab, Nov 17, 2005
    #12
  13. lab

    lab Guest

    And the best solution (as was recommended above) is to be brave, open
    the laptop, and use the hard drive with a IDE USB adaptor, about $13,
    which is good for adding extra (slow) hard drives to any computer and
    transferring, backing up stuff etc.

    Quicker than Infrared (which I couldn't get working, what a waste of
    time, and sloooww serial.
     
    lab, Dec 9, 2005
    #13
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