1. This forum section is a read-only archive which contains old newsgroup posts. If you wish to post a query, please do so in one of our main forum sections (here). This way you will get a faster, better response from the members on Motherboard Point.

Solaris vs Linux on SPARC and x86/AMD

Discussion in 'Intel' started by Hunn E. Balsiche, May 13, 2004.

  1. Is there differences between Solaris 9 and Linux 2.6 in term of :
    - performance w.r.t database, web, and other server related apps
    - compatibility with various hardware
    - cost
    - expandability
    - security
    - hardware vendor support, e.g disk storage
    - dependability - i've seen Solaris on SPARC running for years
    without rebooting
    - stability
    - recoverability when disaster happen
    - interopability with other OS

    Is it safe to say that outside SPARC platform, Linux win for all the above?
    How about if we install Linux on SPARC as well? Many are comfortable with
    single platform architecture such as SPARC from Sun Microsystem or they are
    already invested in SPARC hardware.

    Regards
     
    Hunn E. Balsiche, May 13, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. |Is there differences between Solaris 9 and Linux 2.6 in term of :
    |- performance w.r.t database, web, and other server related apps
    |- compatibility with various hardware
    |- cost
    |- expandability
    |- security
    |- hardware vendor support, e.g disk storage
    |- dependability - i've seen Solaris on SPARC running for years
    | without rebooting
    |- stability
    |- recoverability when disaster happen
    |- interopability with other OS

    Yes, there are definitely differences.

    |Is it safe to say that outside SPARC platform, Linux win for all the above?

    Absolutely not. Linux will win in some areas or for some applications,
    Solaris for others, and some will simply be a draw.

    Even something as simple seeming as cost, it's hard to declare a winner
    for all cases. From what you list as important, it sounds like you want
    an enterprise server, in which case I believe Solaris x86 is cheaper
    than several of the big enterprise Linux packages.
     
    Alan Coopersmith, May 13, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Hunn E. Balsiche

    CJT Guest

    FWIW, I've found Solaris X86 to be very capable, very robust,
    very stable, very well documented, and very economical. Linux
    has many applications, particularly for the desktop (many of
    these might also run on Solaris, but they are at home on Linux),
    and also supports more hardware (although not always necessarily
    at high quality).

    I think both can be made secure, and that any inquiry into
    price/performance is fact-intensive.
     
    CJT, May 13, 2004
    #3
  4. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Rich Teer Guest

    Not in the least. Linux might win a few (e.g., it works on more
    HW), but loses on others (RHES is more expensive than Solaris x86,
    for example).
    Linux on SPARC is just not an option, IMHO.

    Depending on your needs (which you haven't articluated in detail
    here), Linux might be an OK choice for you. But I strongly
    expect that Solaris x86 would be a better one.

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-online.net
     
    Rich Teer, May 13, 2004
    #4
  5. Why would he want to install RHES ? A properly configured Linux system can
    do all of that.
    IIRC, Debian has a SPARC port.
     
    Madhusudan Singh, May 13, 2004
    #5
  6. Hunn E. Balsiche

    slrn Guest

    Interesting discovery, I should enable my FULL HEADER more often.
    It could be just coincident, but the same type of questions keep
    coming up, and lack of reading on materials responded by posters.

    From: "Hunn E. Balsiche" <>
    Message-ID: <>
    X-Trace: news.uni-berlin.de
    X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.3790.0
    X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.3790.132

    From: "Sarah Tanembaum" <>
    Message-ID: <>
    X-Trace: news.uni-berlin.de
    X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.3790.0
    X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.3790.132
     
    slrn, May 14, 2004
    #6
  7. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Vahid Guest


    Well, we have gone thru this path a few month ago after the huge linux
    buzz in the company, then upper mgnt realized that linux is very
    expensive and not much to offer (we were telling them all along). Now,
    we are testing apps on Solaris x86.
    Sun is very aggresive about rolling out x86 and will give a very good
    price on AMD H/W and Solaris x86 for free depending on your current
    contract.
     
    Vahid, May 15, 2004
    #7
  8. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Judd Guest

    From a developers standpoint, I wouldn't bother with Solaris X86. Sun's on
    again off again approach to supporting it's development doesn't make one
    feel cozy about spending money developing applications for it. Linux has a
    huge installer base and it isn't extremely expensive. Yes, Redhat is now
    earning money on the software but there are other freeware versions out
    there that are growing in installed base as well. I would jump to BSD
    before Solaris X86.
     
    Judd, May 17, 2004
    #8
  9. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Dave Uhring Guest

    Wholly specious. Applications developed on Solaris will compile without
    error or rewrite on Linux. Do you really wish to exclude a potential
    market by using Linux specific API?
    Free is not expensive at all. Software support contracts *are* possibly
    expensive regardless of which OS the customer chooses.
    Good for them and their customers who had previously been using Microsfot
    products.
    Which one? None of the presently available BSDs have scalable SMP
    capability. FreeBSD claims that but I can crash its kernel by running
    xine under a user account. Same thing with NetBSD.
     
    Dave Uhring, May 17, 2004
    #9
  10. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Ian Guest

    I don't think anyone does develop applications specifically (except
    drivers) for Solaris x86, we develop for Solaris and compile for x86 or
    Sparc. Or Linux for that matter.

    Ian
     
    Ian, May 17, 2004
    #10
  11. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Rich Teer Guest

    You're obviously not very up to date with Sun's recent commitment
    to Solaris x86.
    Try comparing the cost of RHES and Solaris x86.
    Then you are, with all dur respect, a fool. But to each their own...

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-online.net
     
    Rich Teer, May 17, 2004
    #11
  12. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Dave Uhring Guest

    Rich, that is a bit difficult. RHES has such a high price because the
    software maintenance contract comes bundled with it. One would need to
    add the cost of Sun's contract to the RTU license fee to get the
    equivalent cost of Solaris.
     
    Dave Uhring, May 17, 2004
    #12
  13. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Judd Guest

    RHES includes support in their package (I believe it's a year of support,
    but might be more). RHES has a much larger installed base.
    Funny thing is... many agree with this fool. I used to develop for Solaris
    x86 back in the mid 90's. It's highly doubtful that I'll ever go back. I'm
    not at all convinced that it's not a dead end project.
     
    Judd, May 17, 2004
    #13
  14. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Rich Teer Guest

    Fair comment about the support, but I'd be surprised if RHES
    has a bigger installed base than Solaris x86. I don't doubt
    that the regular version of RH does, however, have a larger
    installed user base.
    On what basis are you not being convinced? Device drivers
    aside, developing for Solaris x86 is essentially the same
    as developing for Solaris on SPARC. For properly written
    software, a recompile should be all that's required.

    Veritas, Oracle, and many other ISVs are "going back" to
    Solaris x86, so maybe you should reconsider your decision...

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-online.net
     
    Rich Teer, May 17, 2004
    #14
  15. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Rich Teer Guest

    True, although RHES does have other advanatages over the regular
    version. I'm think of support for more than 1 year (IIRC, RHES
    is supported for 5 years). Even without a support contract, Solairs
    users are "supported" for more than 5 years, in the way of patches
    and Update releases.

    It's the longer than one year support I was thinking of, from an
    enterprise point of view.

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-online.net
     
    Rich Teer, May 17, 2004
    #15
  16. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Judd Guest

    Don't be surprised! Redhat is doing very well with the RHES product. Other
    Linux vendors may follow suit it's worked so well for them. They have
    credibility few other Linux vendors enjoy.
    I suppose that would "depend". You have endian issues to deal with amongst
    other things (most at the hardware level of course e.g. packing). For high
    level C++/Java type development, cross platform should be relatively
    seemeless for the Solaris versions. There are very few header issues last I
    checked. Still, it is just not widely used which is why I'm not convinced
    that it's not a dead end project. Sun's on again off again support for the
    product has allowed Linux to really take a huge foothold and make Solaris
    x86 a passing thought. Even BSD gets more attention these days.
     
    Judd, May 18, 2004
    #16
  17. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Dave Uhring Guest

    This discussion revolves about the x86 architecture. Do you think that
    Solaris on x86 is big-endian?
    Which BSD is that?
     
    Dave Uhring, May 18, 2004
    #17
  18. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Rich Teer Guest

    And Sun is doing very well with its Solaris product.
    Hence why I said "properly written". And those issue are also present
    in Linux when porting from one platform to another. Or are you, like
    so many Linux advocates, equating Linux with Linux on x86? Or for that
    matter, I hear that an app written for one Linux distro won't necessarily
    work on another. That's really great...
    When did you last chack?
    Sun delayed Solaris for x86 exactly ONCE. I'd hardly call that "on again,
    off again". Yes, Sun made a stupid decision to delay Solaris 9 for x86,
    giving you and other anti-Sun FUDsters ammunition. But they listened to
    their customers and the community, and Solaris on x86 is now given equal
    footing (where possible) to Solaris on SPARC.
    Linux and BSD have a got their market share because of their percieved
    low cost and (especially in the case of the former) "cool" factor.

    --
    Rich Teer, SCNA, SCSA

    President,
    Rite Online Inc.

    Voice: +1 (250) 979-1638
    URL: http://www.rite-online.net
     
    Rich Teer, May 18, 2004
    #18
  19. Hunn E. Balsiche

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    Solaris/x86 has taken on a new strategic significance at Sun these days,
    mainly because of its move towards Opteron gear. Sun was one of the original
    OS announcements for AMD64, but then in between, Sun rethought its strategy
    about support for any kind of x86 Solaris at all, and then rethought it once
    again. It's now got Veritas onboard developing software for Solaris/x86 and
    likely the upcoming Solaris/AMD64, something Veritas never bothered with in
    the past.

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, May 18, 2004
    #19
  20. The primary difference is that Linux has iptables firewall in the
    kernel, and can be trusted without a separate firewall if necessary. All
    the other issues are split a few one way and a few the other. A lot
    depends on which flavor of admin you like, which is a question of taste,
    not technical.
     
    Bill Davidsen, May 18, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.