Some Macs that run Lion won't run Mountain Lion

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Michelle Steiner, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. <http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/12/02/16/mountain_lion_signals_end_of_
    life_for_older_macs.html>

    In its announcement of OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion on Thursday, Apple failed to
    mention that a handful of Macs that will be cut from the fold when the next
    generation operating system debuts this summer due to end of support for
    older Intel integrated graphics chipsets.

    Certain Macs made from 2006 to 2008 that incorporate Intel's GMA 950 and
    GMA X3100 integrated graphics processors will not be supported (machine
    translation) by Mountain Lion, which means that Apple's newest version of
    OS X marks the end of the software road for owners of these computers,
    according to French Apple blog MacGeneration.

    A list of affected machines:

    € Any Intel Core 2 Duo MacBook from late 2007 to late 2008 (Model
    Numbers: MB061*/B, MB062*/B, MB063*/B, MB402*/A MB403*/A MB404*/A, MB402*/B)

    € Mid 2007 Mac mini (Model Numbers: MB138*/A, MB139*/A)

    € Mid to Late 2006 polycarbonate iMac (Model Numbers: MA406xx/A,
    MA710xx/A)

    € Early 2008 MacBook Air (Model Number: MB003LL/A)

    The cycle of ending support for previous generation machines is an
    inevitability with the fast-paced world of computing as new operating
    systems and software are simply too complex to run optimally on older
    hardware.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 16, 2012
    #1
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  2. Michelle Steiner

    Alan Browne Guest

    I can't find the article there.
    Might affect my son's MBP.
    SO's MBA is "Mid 2009" per the "about" page.

    My iMac is okay.

    Thanks for posting that.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 16, 2012
    #2
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  3. I can't find the article there.[/QUOTE]

    <http://www.macgeneration.com/news/voir/234432/os-x-10.8-necessitera-un-mac-
    recent>
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 16, 2012
    #3
  4. Excuse me, but I don't understand the relevance of this post. I mean,
    the youngest of those computers is now 4 years old. 4 years!!!

    Here, we got rid of all this nonsense. Every second year, a friend of my
    son, who's a real whiz kid, orders 3 Minis for my wife, my son and I. He
    installs them, replaces the dog's with an old model and picks up the 3
    computers as a pay. (He's taking psychology and is doing experiments on
    our dog. The dog just luvs the games with his 16 key keyboard.)

    All of this is more than free as I've bought 10,000 shares when they
    were only worth around $100. They're now worth $5,000,000. I'm really
    ROFLOL.

    It's absolutely no use struggling: just buy Apple shares and all Apple
    hardware will more than pay for itself.
     
    Mark V. Dudley, Feb 17, 2012
    #4
  5. Michelle Steiner

    Warren Oates Guest

    I think you got priammed.
     
    Warren Oates, Feb 17, 2012
    #5
  6. Michelle Steiner

    George Kerby Guest

    True DAT!
     
    George Kerby, Feb 17, 2012
    #6
  7. Michelle Steiner

    jt august Guest

    }
    <http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/12/02/16/mountain_lion_signals_end_
    of_
    } life_for_older_macs.html>
    }
    } In its announcement of OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion on Thursday, Apple
    failed to
    } mention that a handful of Macs that will be cut from the fold when the
    next
    } generation operating system debuts this summer due to end of support
    for
    } older Intel integrated graphics chipsets.
    }
    } Certain Macs made from 2006 to 2008 that incorporate Intel's GMA 950
    and
    } GMA X3100 integrated graphics processors will not be supported
    (machine
    } translation) by Mountain Lion, which means that Apple's newest version
    of
    } OS X marks the end of the software road for owners of these computers,
    } according to French Apple blog MacGeneration.
    }
    } A list of affected machines:
    }
    } € Any Intel Core 2 Duo MacBook from late 2007 to late 2008 (Model
    } Numbers: MB061*/B, MB062*/B, MB063*/B, MB402*/A MB403*/A MB404*/A,
    MB402*/B)
    } €
    } € Mid 2007 Mac mini (Model Numbers: MB138*/A, MB139*/A)
    } €
    } € Mid to Late 2006 polycarbonate iMac (Model Numbers: MA406xx/A,
    } MA710xx/A)
    } €
    } € Early 2008 MacBook Air (Model Number: MB003LL/A)
    }
    } The cycle of ending support for previous generation machines is an
    } inevitability with the fast-paced world of computing as new operating
    } systems and software are simply too complex to run optimally on older
    } hardware.


    (Forgive me the non-standard qquote symbol, but my free news server
    limits how many lines of quote I can have, so I have to go this route to
    circumvent their limit.)

    But sadly, this means the longevity factor for the value of buying a Mac
    is now gone. The Mac ci, lc and quadras all had useful lives (albeit
    limited in late life) of 10 years, perhaps more. I'm still surviving on
    my G4 tower for much, though my 2010 iMac covers what this old workhorse
    can no longer handle.

    But it seems to me that Apple is now accelerating the close out window
    of older hardware. Killing off the viability of the early MacBook Air
    already? It's still a puppy.

    jt
     
    jt august, Feb 18, 2012
    #7
  8. Or you could trim the quote to just the essential part.
    No, it doesn't. All that it means is that you can't run the latest version
    of the OS.
    The Mac CI was released on September 20, 1989 with System 6.0.4, and
    discontinued on February 10, 1993. Ten years after it was introduced, the
    current Mac OS was Jaguar, with Panther being released a month later. The
    latest version of the OS that it could run on was Mac OS 7.6.1, which was
    released in 1997.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 18, 2012
    #8
  9. Michelle Steiner

    sbt Guest

    Michelle, your math is off a bit. Introduced in 1989, then ten years
    later is 1999 and OS X wasn't even out yet. Panther came out in 2003
    (October), which is 10 years and 8 months after the February
    discontinuation.
     
    sbt, Feb 18, 2012
    #9
  10. Michelle, your math is off a bit. Introduced in 1989, then ten years
    later is 1999 and OS X wasn't even out yet. Panther came out in 2003
    (October), which is 10 years and 8 months after the February
    discontinuation.[/QUOTE]

    Teaches me to get on line before breakfast. Actually, the last sentence of
    my message was all that I needed to say.
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 18, 2012
    #10
  11. Michelle Steiner

    sbt Guest

    Teaches me to get on line before breakfast. Actually, the last sentence of
    my message was all that I needed to say.[/QUOTE]

    Sounds like a corollary to the sign my wife has on the coffeemaker in
    the kitchen: "Is there life before coffee?" I reply affirmatively,
    because I don't drink coffee; however, she isn't functional until she
    has at least one (large) cup inside her.
     
    sbt, Feb 18, 2012
    #11
  12. Um, no hot tea or chocolate?
     
    Michelle Steiner, Feb 18, 2012
    #12
  13. The period from the date that a model is discontinued to the date that
    it no longer runs the latest version of the operating system has
    averaged closer to four years than ten. In the past twenty years, it has
    ranged from less than three years (for some models introduced around the
    times of the two architecture transitions) to a little over five years
    (for some of the G4s).

    To get a supported life, the average lifespan of an OS version should be
    added to that hardware average in order to account for the period during
    which Apple supplies security updates to the prior OS version. To get a
    useful life, consider adding yet another OS lifespan to account for the
    fact that Apple supports the grandfather version with updates for
    iTunes, Safari, and peripheral drivers.

    With Mountain Lion, Apple will restore the tempo of OS upgrades to
    something like the pre-Tiger days. Tiger and the Leopards lasted (on
    average) about two years each, so moving to an annual upgrade schedule
    only knocks about a year off a supported life or two years off a
    (stingily defined) useful life.

    In any case, most of us have found the usefulness of our old Macs
    compromised less by Apple's forced marches than by the need for ever
    more processing power and memory to handle all the new gewgaws being
    added to web pages. With a little luck, that era may be ending. Please?
     
    Neill Massello, Feb 18, 2012
    #13
  14. Michelle Steiner

    David Empson Guest

    There are also rumours that 2006 and 2007 Mac Pro, and 2006 to 2008
    Xserve models won't be suppored by Mountain Lion (allegedly because they
    don't support the 64-bit kernel, which surprises me in the case of the
    2008 Xserve, since the 2008 Mac Pro does and it was released first).
    Agreed to some extent, but not because Mountain Lion is dropping support
    for some 2008 models.
    If you think Mountain Lion not supporting the original MacBook Air is
    faster than normal, then you haven't been paying attention.

    The last three versions of Mac OS X have dropped support for some models
    discontinued less than four years earlier. 10.0 and 10.6 were the worst
    so far, followed by 10.5 and 10.7. 10.8 will fall somewhere between 10.6
    and 10.7 on this scale.

    The "youngest victim" of each version, based on date discontinued
    according to MacTracker:

    10.0: two years and four months (PowerBook 2400c).
    10.1: (same models supported)
    10.2: (same models supported)
    10.3: four years and five months (PowerBook G3 late 1998).
    10.4: four years and two months (350 MHz iMac G3 mid 2000).
    10.5: three years and six months (800 MHz iBook G4 late 2003).
    10.6: three years (PowerMac G5 late 2005).
    10.7: three years and eleven months (Mac Mini late 2006).

    Looking at the list of models with GMA 9500 or GMA X3100, the worst case
    is the mid 2007 Mac Mini, which was discontinued in March 2009. If
    Mountain Lion is released in August 2012, that's three years and five
    months, for a model which was very long in the tooth when superseded.

    The other unsupported models discontinued less than four years earlier
    are the MacBook (early 2008): 3y10m, MacBook (late 2008): 3y7m, MacBook
    Air (early 2008): 3y10m.

    Ignoring the major transitions in 10.0 and 10.6, that is a bigger list
    than normal of unsupported models less than four less old, but two of
    them (including the MacBook Air) are only a little short of four years.


    A more significant issue with the rapid release cycle is if it signals
    earlier cutoff of security updates and other updates for the second
    earlier system. With Mountain Lion being released this year, does that
    mean Snow Leopard will stop getting security and other updates this
    year? I was anticipating it would last well into next year.

    It appears the last update of Safari for Leopard was about when Lion was
    released, which is worse than Tiger (more than a year after Snow Leopard
    was released). There haven't been any Safari updates for Snow Leopard
    since November, but Lion has had a Safari update as part of 10.7.3.

    iTunes support for Leopard hasn't stopped yet, but based on the timing
    of when Apple dropped iTunes support for Tiger, iTunes support for
    Leopard will probably disappear in either March (iPad 3) or October
    (iPhone 5). After that, Apple won't support Leopard (and therefore
    PowerPC Macs) for any new or updated software they release.

    With 10.4 to 10.7, there was a roughly two year gap between versions, so
    Apple supported the previous OS version for about two years after it was
    superseded. Add that to a typical four to five year support window for
    new OS releases, and you got reasonable support for at least five and
    probably six years after your Mac model was discontinued. That might be
    four to five years now.

    Buying a model earlier in its life cycle gets you a longer support
    window, of course. The extreme example was the mid 2007 Mac Mini, which
    was unchanged for 19 months.


    Assuming Apple sticks to a "must support Macs in new OS releases for at
    least three years after they are discontinued" policy, that has some
    implications for the next few versions of OS X.

    The current 11 inch MacBook Air comes with 2 GB of RAM in the stock
    model. Even if it is replaced with a model that has 4 GB minimum this
    year, Mountain Lion will need to support 2 GB, as will the OS X versions
    released in 2013 and 2014, but the 2015 edition of OS X could require a
    minimum of 4 GB RAM.

    There aren't any other obvious hardware feature cutoffs apart from the
    degree of graphics functionality. I'm not familiar enough with the
    capabilities of each graphics controller to speculate on which models
    the 2013 or later versions might stop supporting, but a rule of thumb
    would be to consider whether your model's graphics controller was used
    in any models sold less than three years prior to the new OS: if so,
    your model will probably be supported.

    OpenCL comes to mind - the current MacBook Air and 13" MacBook Pro don't
    support it, but the next models will (Ivy Bridge). Therefore Mac OS X
    cannot require OpenCL support until a version released in 2015 or later.
     
    David Empson, Feb 19, 2012
    #14
  15. Michelle Steiner

    Paul Sture Guest

    Yes, that's the main reason I retired my G3 iBook from use. It was still
    a good little workhorse, but couldn't keep up with the amounts of
    Javascript or Youtube people were throwing at me.

    I also wanted the desk space it was occupying. I might yet find a use
    for it so haven't recycled it.
     
    Paul Sture, Feb 19, 2012
    #15
  16. Michelle Steiner

    sbt Guest

    No question, but Apple really could be a little bit more honest/upfront
    about compatibility.

    For example, Lion's introduction required 2GB of RAM, which meant that
    the plethora of Core2Duo machines that shipped with 1GB couldn't
    install Lion until they got a RAM upgrade. Minor quibble since the 2GB
    requirement was in the tech specs, but it could have been included in
    the advertising that said what you needed was a Core2Duo.

    A larger, and more hidden, incompatibility was the number of models,
    some only a year since introduction, that don't support AirDrop, a
    feature Apple was really touting. This one was particularly annoying
    for me because I did know that I had to upgrade the MacBook the
    grandkids use here to 2GB, but nothing in the technical requirements
    gave a clue that AirDrop wasn't going to be available and it WAS a
    selling point for upgrading this model...oh well, at least I can still
    transfer the files via iChat (the grandkids don't "clean up after
    themselves", which makes file sharing more problematic).
     
    sbt, Feb 19, 2012
    #16
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