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Stock cpu fan and heatsink on AMD Athlon dual-core x64

Discussion in 'AMD Overclocking' started by Bob Fry, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. Bob Fry

    Bob Fry Guest

    I have a homebuilt pc with the AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual-Core 4200+ (AM2
    socket), cooled by the stock heatsink and fan that comes with the cpu.

    The stock fan has no mobo controlled speed, though the mobo supports
    such (Abit NF-M2 nView). Though it doesn't run hot at all, I'd like
    to replace just the fan with a speed-controllable one. But I don't
    want to replace the heatsink if possible. Being this is my first
    homebuilt, I have a basic question: Can I replace only the fan with a
    controllable one? If so, what size should I look for, and what power
    connector? The stock fan has a 3-pin connector but the mobo supports a
    4-pin cpu connector.

    Thanks!!
     
    Bob Fry, Dec 30, 2006
    #1
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  2. Bob Fry

    johns Guest

    Use a manual controller on the fan you have.
    It is just a big resistor thingy with settings.

    johns
     
    johns, Dec 30, 2006
    #2
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  3. I NEVER use stock fans, on my last build i got a Zalman CNPS9500 AM2 for my
    Athlon 62 X2 5000+.
    http://www.zalman.co.kr/usa/product/view.asp?idx=202&code=005
    I can control the fan speed, from out side of case, but never needed to.

    LA
     
    Leigh-Anne Mills, Dec 30, 2006
    #3
  4. Bob Fry

    Wes Newell Guest

    The stock fan is just a fan like any other fan. The MB is what supplies
    the automatic speed control if it supports it. if you would read your
    manual you'd know how to use the MB speed control with the AMD fan or any
    other 3 pin fan. From the manual;

    In the situation when connecting a 3-pin CPU fan assembly, and you still
    want the speed control function to take effect, you must:

    I'll let you find and read the rest.
     
    Wes Newell, Dec 30, 2006
    #4
  5. Bob Fry

    Bob Fry Guest

    WN> In the situation when connecting a 3-pin CPU fan assembly, and
    WN> you still want the speed control function to take effect, you
    WN> must:

    Yes, I've done that, but still would like to have a mobo-controllable
    cpu fan [4-pin?], replacing just the fan, retaining the stock
    AMD-supplied AM2 socket heatsink. Any hints?
     
    Bob Fry, Dec 31, 2006
    #5
  6. Bob Fry

    tanstafl Guest

    You've already done -- What? You apparently did not follow Wes'
    genteelly worded advice to consult the manual - he even gave you the
    lead-in sentence for orientation. You don't need a new fan - just
    knowledge. Allow me to paraphrase Wes: *RTFM* :)
     
    tanstafl, Dec 31, 2006
    #6
  7. Bob Fry

    Bob Fry Guest

    WN> In the situation when connecting a 3-pin CPU fan assembly, and
    WN> you still want the speed control function to take effect, you
    WN> must:
    tan> You've already done -- What? You apparently did not follow
    tan> Wes' genteelly worded advice to consult the manual - he even
    tan> gave you the lead-in sentence for orientation. You don't
    tan> need a new fan - just knowledge. Allow me to paraphrase Wes:
    tan> *RTFM* :)

    I've already read the fine manual, thank you, and per its instructions
    connected the stock fan's 3-pin connector to the 4-pin SYS connector
    on the mobo and changed the bios to control the SYS fan for the cpu
    fan. The mobo's 4-pin SYS connector allows the 3-pin to connect only
    the correct way. So, at the moment, the mobo is controlling the cpu
    fan.

    But I don't want to leave it that way! Please read my original
    request: is there a controllable (4-pin) replacement fan for the stock
    AM2 socket fan that I don't have to replace the heatsink, just the
    fan. I'm not even sure what size fan the stock fan is. I measured the
    fan fram itself as 70 mm, but that seems unusual.
     
    Bob Fry, Dec 31, 2006
    #7
  8. Bob Fry

    Wes Newell Guest

    Then pick the fan of your choice and install it. I don't see a problem.
    Personally, I'd use an 80x25mm fan or larger if I was going to replace the
    stock 70mm fan. Other than that, you have a MB controllerable fan now in
    the stock fan.
     
    Wes Newell, Dec 31, 2006
    #8
  9. Bob Fry

    Wes Newell Guest

    If you have a 3pin fan, you can plug it into the 4 pin header, but you
    don't get speed control that way. Now go to page 2-7 and keep looking at
    it til you find what I quoted, and then continue to read. You should see
    this;

    In the situation when connecting a 3-pin CPU fan assembly, and you still
    want the speed control function to take effect, you must:

    1. Plug the 3-pin CPU fan assembly to "SYSFAN1" fan power connector.

    2. In the "PC Health Status" of the BIOS Setup Menu, set the "SYS FanEQ
    Reference Temp." from the default "System" to "CPU".
     
    Wes Newell, Dec 31, 2006
    #9
  10. Bob Fry

    Bob Fry Guest

    WN> Then pick the fan of your choice and install it. I don't see a
    WN> problem.

    As I said in my original post, being new to homebuilding, I wasn't
    sure what fan size would work. When a fan specs say 80mm or 120mm, is
    that the diameter of the blades? The fan housing (frame)? or the
    distance between the mounting screws?

    WN> Personally, I'd use an 80x25mm fan or larger if I
    WN> was going to replace the stock 70mm fan.

    But will any 80mm fan simply bolt on to the stock heatsink? That's
    all I'm trying to find out.

    WN Other than that, you
    WN> have a MB controllerable fan now in the stock fan.

    Yes, but then my case fan loses its control on the MB. Hence the
    desire to replace the cpu fan.
     
    Bob Fry, Dec 31, 2006
    #10
  11. Bob Fry

    Wes Newell Guest

    Get a 70->80mm fan adapter. or 70->92 if you want to use a 92mm fan.

    http://www.svc.com/fa-7080.html

    The problem is going to be finding a PWM fan the size you want.
     
    Wes Newell, Dec 31, 2006
    #11
  12. Bob Fry

    spodosaurus Guest

    What is the size of the current fan, measured along one side?

    How is the current fan attached to the heat sink?

    Regards,

    Ari

    --
    spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply
    Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant. Please
    volunteer to be a marrow donor and literally save someone's life:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
     
    spodosaurus, Jan 1, 2007
    #12
  13. Bob Fry

    Bob Fry Guest

    WN> Personally, I'd use an 80x25mm fan or larger if I was going to
    WN> replace the stock 70mm fan. But will any 80mm
    sp> What is the size of the current fan, measured along one side?

    sp> How is the current fan attached to the heat sink?

    In the course of investigating alternative fans I pulled the fan off
    the heatsink.

    I was surprised at the cheezy way the fan attaches to the heatsink: 4
    machine screws which sort of tap themselves in between fins on the
    heatsink. Hey, don't waste money on engineering a real attachment
    mechanism. Turns out the fan is from AVC, and I think mine is this
    one: http://www.avc.com.tw/products/Z7LB00C.htm. My model # is
    DE07015B12L. They describe their ID system at
    http://www.avc.com.tw/products/IDENTIFICATION.htm

    The AMD stock fan is 70mm by the ID system, and 70mm measured on a
    side.
     
    Bob Fry, Jan 1, 2007
    #13
  14. Bob Fry

    spodosaurus Guest

    This is standard and allows interoperability with other fans. This is
    also what allows you to replace the fan easily.

    Be careful you haven't disrupted the thermal pad - if your temps start
    climbing you'll need to re-seat the heat sink after cleaning off the
    remains of the thermal pad from the heat sink and CPU die. A google
    search of this group for keywords regarding that procedure and
    author:spodosaurus will get you my methods.

    Great. Well, you can either look for a 70mm fan at many online stores,
    especially those specialising in cooling and modifications, or you can
    also look at these places for a 70-92mm adapter or a 70-80mm adapter.
    Make sure the airflow in CFM is equivalent to your current fan. Also
    make sure the noise level does not exceed your current fan, if that's an
    issue for you. How many case fans do you have presently, out of curiousity?

    Regards,

    Ari


    --
    spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply
    Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow transplant. Please
    volunteer to be a marrow donor and literally save someone's life:
    http://www.abmdr.org.au/
    http://www.marrow.org/
     
    spodosaurus, Jan 1, 2007
    #14
  15. Bob Fry

    Bob Fry Guest

    sp> Great. Well, you can either look for a 70mm fan at many online
    sp> stores, especially those specialising in cooling and
    sp> modifications, or you can also look at these places for a
    sp> 70-92mm adapter or a 70-80mm adapter. Make sure the airflow in
    sp> CFM is equivalent to your current fan. Also make sure the
    sp> noise level does not exceed your current fan, if that's an
    sp> issue for you. How many case fans do you have presently, out
    sp> of curiousity?

    Three, all 120mm: back, front, and side; and a top 80mm fan which I
    disconnected. Overcooled for my purposes, but I like the case (NZXT
    LEXA-NP; http://www.nzxt.com/products/lexa/).

    Thanks for the info about the fan. I don't need to replace the cpu
    fan, but then I could have bought a more-or-less equivalent built
    computer for less money too. It's fun to tinker a bit with these
    things.
     
    Bob Fry, Jan 1, 2007
    #15
  16. Bob Fry

    James Guest

    The whole purpose of all these fans is to compensate for the horribly
    small and inadequate heat sinks used. The only purpose of the heat sink
    is to keep the chip/case/etc. cool enough for the devices to survive.
    The lower the temperature the longer they will live. For this reason
    moving more air or installing large enough heat sinks to eliminate the
    need for the fans would be the solution. Since parts like the hard
    drives also can run warm and the power supply itself needs the air
    moving through it to survive you really can't get rid of the case fans
    but you can install larger ones that move more air. Filtering the
    incoming air will also reduce the dust buildup which, in turn, will help
    keep the parts cool. The cpu, math chip, etc. can have larger heat
    sinks custom made, by you, to fit your particular case that can
    eliminate those fans at least. With them gone it no longer matters if
    the mobo can control a fan since it will no longer exist. Look at the
    construction of the high quality server cases and modify your box to
    follow them more closely if you can.

    James
     
    James, Jan 4, 2007
    #16
  17. Bob Fry

    Bob Fry Guest

    James> The cpu, math chip, etc. can have larger heat sinks custom
    James> made, by you, to fit your particular case that can
    James> eliminate those fans at least. With them gone it no longer
    James> matters if the mobo can control a fan since it will no
    James> longer exist.

    Uhhh....sure. I think you're serious with this suggestion, which is
    utterly impractical. I'm supposed to custom make a cpu heatsink (BTW,
    there is no separate "math chip" in a PC and hasn't been for decades)
    of such design that the cpu fan is no longer needed.

    Just out of curiosity, have you looked at PC cpus and motherboards
    since, say, 1982? I ask because around then I had a dual CP/M / Apple
    II computer with both cpus (Z80 and Motorola ??) which was from
    Germany and built like a brick ****house. Solid, heavy aluminum and
    no fans. Basis I think was the company name.

    Since then, cpus have come a long way, consume a lot more power, and
    produce a lot more heat. Probably in some very specialized situations
    they can be run with no fan, but not for Joe Home PC user.
     
    Bob Fry, Jan 5, 2007
    #17
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