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Tablet PC vs. Wacom Cintiq

Discussion in 'Tablet PC' started by lonny thompson, Aug 27, 2003.

  1. I teach engineering mathematics courses.
    Currently, I give lectures by writing on blank overhead transpancies
    with Sanford Sharpie Fine Point permanant markers.
    This entails writing lots of math
    equations and details which require a fine point marker.


    I would like to replace transparencies with
    use of a TabletPC or Wacom Cintiq tablet with digital ink.
    I would like high pressure sensitivity with ability to
    write with fine detail, smooth natural
    pen flow for writing detailed math equations.

    Do all different branded/model Tablet PC's use the same pressure
    sensitive LCD
    screen and pen, or are some brands/models better.
    Wacom claims that better colors and 512 pressure sensitive levels are
    available
    with there Cintiq tablet. Is this better than any TabletPC can offer?

    I would like the portability of a TabletPC, but if the
    writing feel is inferior to what Wacom Cintiq can offer, i may
    consider this.

    -thanks for any help

    see below for Wacom's marketing from their website.

    Tablet PC's are developed with a primary focus on highly portable
    solutions and most of them employ Wacom's
    PenabledTM sensor technology.
    For stationary systems, similar functionality can be achieved by
    combining a Wacom Cintiq® interactive pen display with a desktop PC.
    For requirements that do not include portability, Cintiq offers the
    following unique benefits:

    Flat Panel Display is Separate from Computer- display technology
    typically has a longer life than the
    computer with which it works. By separating the display from the
    computer, you can upgrade without having to
    throw away key components, like your display. Separating the display
    from the computer can be more cost effective in the long run.

    Highest Performance Interactive Pen Display- Wacom's Cintiq offers
    unique features like an eraser pen
    with 512 pressure levels, improved pen-on-paper feel, larger screen
    area, better viewing angle, and better
    color.

    Flexible System Configuration- the Cintiq can be configured with many
    different types of PC's and offers
    industry standard display and input device connectivity, like USB or
    Serial, VGA or DVI video. You can put
    together any kind of system you require for your specific needs.

    Multiple Sizes- Cintiq comes in a 15" display size with XGA resolution
    (1024x768) or in an 18" size with SXGA
    resolution (1280x1024). Again, you have options to configure according
    to your specific needs and
    preferences.



    For more information about Microsoft Windows XP Tablet PC Edition,
    please visit www.microsoft.com/tabletpc. For more
    information about Wacom Cintiq products, please visit www.cintiq.com.
     
    lonny thompson, Aug 27, 2003
    #1
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  2. The external digitizer will have the significant disadvantage of needing
    hand-eye coordination. Using the overhead, you see what you are writing on
    the transparency and the students view the screen. An external digitizer
    requires that you learn to write while watching the screen, because there
    isn't a viewing surface. I develop my Tablet PC applications using a WACOM
    Intuos-2 external digitizer and the Tablet PC edition of XP on a dual
    processor desktop machine. I can write fairly well with only the screen or
    a projected image, but it's a lot easier to work with a real Tablet PC.

    The Tablet PC lets you see what you are writing on its screen while the
    viewers watch the projection screen, exactly as writing on a transparency.
    Note however, that you must have a model that gives dual output to the
    external video and the Tablet PC screen, for example the ViewSonic V1100.
    Some models let you have only one or the other video output, viz. the Tablet
    screen or the external video connector.

    My experience is that you will adjust quickly to the Tablet PC platform.
    For what you are doing, you can probably use the Journal application. The
    ability to erase, select pen point sizes and colors, and to save your slides
    in a format that can be edited and ammended later will be an advantage to
    both you and the students. The level of detail and pressure sensitivity is
    good on the V1100 I am using, but be certain that you favor models using the
    WACOM digitizer. Another advantage may be that you don't have to stand at
    an overhead, because you'll put the Tablet in your lap while sitting. Using
    the Tablet PC has been an enjoyable experience. Using it to build a
    collection of math lecture notes in journal format would be a lot of fun.

    M. T. Sandford
     
    Maxwell Sandford, Aug 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. lonny thompson

    Al Guest

    Hi, Lonny,

    I'm really not sure why you would need 512 different pressure sensitive
    levels for writing equations. They are surely aimed more at electronic art.

    I teach maths and use a Tablet PC (Compaq TC1000) for many of my lessons.
    For just "writing on the board", I have a variety of Journal templates to
    suit different needs. I also use PowerPoint to prepare information in
    advance (e.g. building up complex equations, using MS Equation or other
    tool), but which I plan to leave spaces for additional "ink" annotations
    during the presentation, either by myself or a student, to keep a degree of
    interactivity. (Otherwise I find PPT presentations can be a bit boring).

    You might also like to take a look at http://www.xthink.com/, who are
    developing a maths product aimed directly at Tablet PCs.

    But if possible, try out the different alternatives to see which one best
    suits your teaching environment and your style.

    Al
     
    Al, Aug 27, 2003
    #3
  4. lonny thompson

    Lonny Guest

    thanks for the input Al.

    I also sometimes prepare premade typeset
    notes and leave spaces for
    students and myself to write on transparencies.
    For this I use
    Latex then convert to Adobe .pdf. When presenting
    on projector using Adobe Acrobat, this gives a similar
    presentation look as Powerpoint. Can you
    write "ink" annotations over any application
    like Adobe Acrobat or are you using something
    specific to Powerpoint; as I would like to avoid
    using Powerpoint and mathtype as I already am
    very proficient at LaTeX-to-pdf documents.

    -Lonny
    http://www.xthink.com/, who are
     
    Lonny, Aug 27, 2003
    #4
  5. lonny thompson

    Lonny Guest

    thanks for your input M.T.

    the Wacom Cintiq is an LCD similar to TabletPC,
    not like the standard Intuos-2 external digitizer;
    the Cintiq is also more expensive than Intuos-2.
    is there a web site such as CNET which reviews
    tablets and will tell me if model uses a WACOM
    digitizer or other?

    thanks,
    Lonny
     
    Lonny, Aug 27, 2003
    #5
  6. lonny thompson

    Kelvin Guest

    I think the advantage of Cintiq over Tablet PC is that Cintiq is display
    only so that you can attach powerful machine to it while Tablet PCs at this
    time still have very limited processing power. This can be a determining
    factor if you demostrate complicated simulation that requires CPU power
    during your teaching. Another advantage of Cintiq over Tablet PC is that you
    can get bigger screens.

    Disvantage of Cintiq is that you have less mobility of course. And you do
    not have Tablet PC OS support for inking capabilities either as it is only
    for Tablet PC currently. Instead you will have to use standard OS and get
    software more geared towards the tablet community to achieve ink capturing.
    For example, if you use Cintiq, you may find "Annotator for Microsoft
    Office" (www.themeanders.com/products.htm) useful for your PowerPoint
    presentation.

    I agree with Al that precise pressure sensitiveness is less important for
    teaching as that is more for digital art.

    --
    Kelvin


    thanks for the input Al.

    I also sometimes prepare premade typeset
    notes and leave spaces for
    students and myself to write on transparencies.
    For this I use
    Latex then convert to Adobe .pdf. When presenting
    on projector using Adobe Acrobat, this gives a similar
    presentation look as Powerpoint. Can you
    write "ink" annotations over any application
    like Adobe Acrobat or are you using something
    specific to Powerpoint; as I would like to avoid
    using Powerpoint and mathtype as I already am
    very proficient at LaTeX-to-pdf documents.

    -Lonny
    http://www.xthink.com/, who are
     
    Kelvin, Aug 28, 2003
    #6
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