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Temp drop of 25 degrees. Was it dust or super cheap mod?

Discussion in 'AMD Overclocking' started by ItsJustMe, Dec 16, 2003.

  1. ItsJustMe

    ItsJustMe Guest

    I have an AMD 1400. Sorry, it's not overclocked so I'm probably off
    topic but I can't think of a group of people who would know more about
    cooling. And my super cheap mod could be slightly useful to someone.

    After heatsink removal, and replacement, How critical is it to replace
    the pad (looks like a small piece of double sided tape to me) between
    the heatsink an the CPU <everytime> as recommended by AMD?

    I read their website, I know the AMD answer is, yes, it must be replaced
    everytime...

    but has anyone ever just left the old one alone? If scraped off
    clearly there would be nothing there, but if left alone it seems to me
    that the remaining halves on the heatsink and cpu would line back up
    (the hold down spring won't be right if the halves of the pad aren't
    lined back up) and press back together. Maybe you couldn't get away with
    it forever but I only did it once.

    I got a 15 to 25 degree temp drop (depending on room temp) by cleaning 2
    years worth of dust collection off the heatsink and putting a piece of
    tape on the top and bottom of the heatsink where there is a large slot
    that the hold down spring passes through. It seemed clear to me,
    confirmed by feeling the airflow with my fingers, that most of the air
    flow was passing through this larger slot, bypassing the cooling fins,
    and doing little cooling. The two small pieces of tape that I applied to
    each end (top and bottom) between the fan and the hold down spring
    blocked most of the large center slot and forced the air from the
    cooling fan through the smaller slots of the cooling fins. There is now
    an airflow difference, through the cooling fins, that I can feel with my
    fingers -- a lot :)

    And the CPU temp, as registered in the CMOS PLUNGED!

    Now, was it dust removal, or the tape that made the dif, or perhaps even
    the way the heat sensor works in combination with the unreplaced heat
    pad producing an unreliable reading??? I know that's reaching but these
    little things worry me:)

    Is it going to fry because I didn't use a new heat pad as recommended by
    AMD?

    Any thoughts appreciated.


    IJM
     
    ItsJustMe, Dec 16, 2003
    #1
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  2. ItsJustMe

    Doughnut Guest

    My friends pc was crashing and his cpu temp was in the mid 70's, i cleaned
    the dust out and now its in the low 50's so i think cleaning the dust has a
    major impact on cooling.

    doughnut
     
    Doughnut, Dec 16, 2003
    #2
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  3. ItsJustMe

    ItsJustMe Guest

    More than 20 c. That's much better than I did.

    I don't pay much attention to the C temperature, but I'm down from 136F
    to 111F (maximum after at least an hour on).

    What was amazing to me, when I started watching the temp, was how fast
    it rises from room temp when powered on -- 20F in about 30 seconds. That
    is no doubt why it's bad to turn it off and on. That initial fast temp
    rise has things expanding so rapidly that occasionally... some tiny
    connection to something just can't take it.


    me
     
    ItsJustMe, Dec 16, 2003
    #3
  4. ItsJustMe

    Roger M Guest



    Yeah the tape thing on the heat sink works wonders. I felt the same way
    about the air bypassing the cooling fins on my amd hsf on my barton. I put
    the tape over the two slots where the clip sticks out and the temp dropped
    about ten degrees on mine. It dropped the temp enough I upped the core
    voltage .5V and raised the fsb up to 212mhz. I'm now running much faster and
    at a lower temperature than before. Neat trick. I use a commercial heat sink
    compound for auto electronics.



    Roger
     
    Roger M, Dec 17, 2003
    #4
  5. ItsJustMe

    Neil Guest


    you'd see even better temps removing the old pad and using some thermal
    paste compared to the old TIM that was on there.



    Neil
     
    Neil, Dec 18, 2003
    #5
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