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ThinkPad T60 vs. Dell Latitude D820?

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by paul_harnik, Jun 21, 2006.

  1. paul_harnik

    paul_harnik Guest

    Hi Folks,

    I'm on the market for a new laptop and am trying to choose between a
    Lenovo ThinkPad T60 and Dell Latitude D820. Does anyone have any
    reccomendations?

    It seems like the they can be customized more or less to have roughly
    comparable hardware though the D820 can exceed the T60 by 0.5 GB of
    memory (2 GB compared to 1.5 for the T60). The Dell is ~$500 cheaper
    though is also a little heavier and larger (by about .5-1 lbs and an
    inch or so). Does anyone have experience with these models? What about
    with either Dell or Lenovo support?

    Thanks for any help you can provide.

    Best wishes,
    Paul
     
    paul_harnik, Jun 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. paul_harnik

    timeOday Guest

    As for support, I recently got a bunch of warranty repairs on my nearly
    3-year-old T40, without hassle. If the $500 T60 premium includes the 3
    year warranty, that's worth something in my book.


    I'm disappointed to hear the T60 can only handle 1.5 GB of RAM though.
    In my book, Thinkpads usually trump Dells on quality and form factor,
    but not necessarily on performance.
     
    timeOday, Jun 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. paul_harnik

    JHEM Guest


    The T60 maxes out at _FOUR_ GB of RAM, not 1.5GB!
     
    JHEM, Jun 24, 2006
    #3
  4. paul_harnik

    B. Wright Guest

    The Dells are built like cheap garbage and you'll get tech
    support out of India. The IBM/Lenovo are well built, have a lot nicer
    keyboards (makes a difference if you use it a lot), and you can rely on
    them for good global warranty support. Spend the extra money and get
    the Lenovo, you won't regret it.
     
    B. Wright, Jun 26, 2006
    #4
  5. paul_harnik

    Notan Guest

    For someone who seems to know it all, you actually know very little.

    1) Depending on the division that a Dell is purchased through (e.g.,
    Small Business), and the warranty level, US based support is available.

    2) IBM/Lenovo is also outsourcing some of its support to India.

    Notan
     
    Notan, Jun 26, 2006
    #5
  6. paul_harnik

    Neil Maxwell Guest

    What's the difference between "global warranty support" and support
    from India? If I call Lenovo for support at 10 pm California time,
    where's the support person?

    I'm thinking about buying another Dell soon, having had good luck (and
    requiring very little support) with the last 4, so I'm curious about
    what's changed.
     
    Neil Maxwell, Jun 26, 2006
    #6
  7. paul_harnik

    B. Wright Guest

    It doesn't have to do with where the support people you talk on
    the phone are. A global warranty means that you can get your laptop
    repaired if it breaks down in another part of the world. If you travel
    a lot and rely on your laptop then a good global warranty with fast
    turnaround is pretty important.
     
    B. Wright, Jun 28, 2006
    #7
  8. paul_harnik

    B. Wright Guest

    1) Right, I'm sure they give preferential treatment to someone
    spending a great deal of money with them or to get the same level of
    service you'll probably pay as much for the machine as the IBM. After
    paying more, you'll still have a poorly made piece of sh*t.

    2) I don't doubt that just about every company is doing some of
    this, but Dell seems to be top on the list. Just for fun, I called both
    of them back to back in the middle of the day, IBM sent me to Atlanta,
    GS, Dell sent me to... guess where... India.

    Here are some articles for interesting reading, the first one I
    had some personal experience with when a friend asked me to look at his
    machine (now out of warranty). There were clearly design/manufacturing
    defects with the motherboards on these machines. Yes, every company is
    not perfect, not even IBM/Lenovo, but I think you have a lot less of a
    chance with problems on one of their machines and a lot more of a chance
    with the Dell. Every time I work on a Dell for someone it reminds me
    why I will never own one again. The last Dell machine I had for any
    period of time was provided on the job. This had a design defect where
    any time the optical drive was spinning it generated so much RF
    interference into the modem circuitry that it would either drop the
    connection or lock the connection up until it re-trained for about a
    minute, after which it was so slow and useless I had to re-connect.
    The keyboard felt like it was mounted on sponge rubber and it actually
    warped upwards a bit and the screen bounced around so much with the
    slightest vibration it felt like it was going to snap the hinges
    eventually. If I had actually paid for this machine it would have been
    right in the box and back to Dell. Oh, and PS, this was on a LARGE
    corporate contract and I did call their tech support on it once, guess
    where my call got routed? Once again, India.

    http://geekswithblogs.net/jjulian/archive/2004/12/09/17171.aspx
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/03/20/dell_india_grow/
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/07/11/dell_customer_support/
     
    B. Wright, Jun 28, 2006
    #8
  9. paul_harnik

    Notan Guest

    My post was in response to your statement, "... and you'll get tech support
    out of India."

    You're still wrong.

    Not that it matters, but was your call to Sales or Support? If Support, I'm
    sure you spoke to an entry level person, with Dell entry level machines
    starting at ~$300, and IBM/Lenovos starting at 2-3 times that price.

    Yes, you have to pay more to get more.

    Notan
     
    Notan, Jun 28, 2006
    #9
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