Upgrade from Asus Rampage Formula iii ??

Discussion in 'Asus' started by srt, May 8, 2012.

  1. srt

    srt Guest

    H,
    I have the above board which I feel pretty let down with on account of the
    Marvel 6gb controller failure to operate correctly :(
    I presently run a new Crucial 256gb ssd along with a WD Raptor 600gb for
    storage.
    The processor is Intel i7 950 @ 3.07GHz
    6 gb Ram Crucial Ballistix ddr3
    Is there an upgrade option that has "REAL" support for 6gb sata and works?
    tia.
    Stuart.
     
    srt, May 8, 2012
    #1
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  2. srt

    Paul Guest

    The Intel Southbridge chips now, have two 6gbit/sec ports.

    It's possible the AMD Southbridge chips have six 6gbit/sec ports.

    Chances are good that just about any new board, will offer something
    like that. There's no reason to use Marvell 9128 chips as a crutch.

    *******

    This site, lists the most recent version of driver. The Marvell site,
    I couldn't find a storage driver on there for the 9128, and a couple
    references to this site is all I could find.

    http://www.station-drivers.com/page/marvell.htm

    Drivers Version 1.2.0.1019 WHQL (Xp/Vista/7) 05/03/12

    The date field there might not be accurate. But perhaps the driver
    version is something to look for (like, in Windows Update or via
    Update Driver from Device Manager).

    The digits sometimes imply "stream" of driver. I notice the
    Asus one is 1.0.0.xxxx while the one above is 1.2.0.xxxx and
    sometimes those distinguish between retail or OEM drivers.
    The difference in this case, might be when the chip is
    soldered to a motherboard, versus being on a separate plug-in card.
    Other than that, I don't know why that digit is different.

    Sometimes, you can find another Asus motherboard with Marvell storage
    on it, and get a driver from there. It appears the Asus ftp site is
    gone, so I can't offer "browsing" to find the best one :-(

    http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=P8P67+DELUXE&p=1&s=39

    That gets me this one. The internal date stamp is 2011-09-02, while
    the Asus page shows a 2012 date.

    http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb...ell91xx_WinXP_V1201006_VistaWin7_V1201010.zip

    I can find a slightly later one here, but still not the 1019 one.
    Internal folder date stamp 2011-12-16.

    http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=P9X79+PRO&p=1&s=42

    http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/misc/sata/Marvell_V1201014_XPVistaWin7.zip

    I was trying to get the driver off an Asus site, as I don't know
    how trustworthy the station-driver site is (never used it).

    You could try a different driver version, and see if that
    helps the stability.

    The 9128 apparently has a single PCI Express lane on the
    chip, meaning it's likely to support one SSD well. And
    benchmarks measure in at around ~400MB/sec or so. They
    never quite make it further than that. An Intel Southbridge
    might do a bit better, and lots of new boards should
    have 4xSATA II + 2xSATA III as their Southbridge config.

    One reason they might not want to put too many III ports,
    is the hub bus between the Southbridge and the processor,
    has limited bandwidth. And they wouldn't want some
    customer trying 6xRAID0 at 500MB/sec per SSD and
    not getting the 3GB/sec transfer rate they were
    expecting. Limiting the number of ports, is to
    reduce people's expectations caused by the hub bus.
    The hub bus does power a number of things, and if
    a user was careful, they might max out that bus.
    (But how many people run a disk benchmark in the
    background, while playing a 3D game. Some of the
    scenarios have to be artificially constructed,
    and at this point in time, aren't realistic in
    how people would normally use a computer.)

    If you want a new motherboard, it shouldn't be hard
    to find one with a native SATA III.

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 8, 2012
    #2
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  3. srt

    srt Guest

    "Paul" wrote in message
    The Intel Southbridge chips now, have two 6gbit/sec ports.

    It's possible the AMD Southbridge chips have six 6gbit/sec ports.

    Chances are good that just about any new board, will offer something
    like that. There's no reason to use Marvell 9128 chips as a crutch.

    *******

    This site, lists the most recent version of driver. The Marvell site,
    I couldn't find a storage driver on there for the 9128, and a couple
    references to this site is all I could find.

    http://www.station-drivers.com/page/marvell.htm

    Drivers Version 1.2.0.1019 WHQL (Xp/Vista/7) 05/03/12

    The date field there might not be accurate. But perhaps the driver
    version is something to look for (like, in Windows Update or via
    Update Driver from Device Manager).

    The digits sometimes imply "stream" of driver. I notice the
    Asus one is 1.0.0.xxxx while the one above is 1.2.0.xxxx and
    sometimes those distinguish between retail or OEM drivers.
    The difference in this case, might be when the chip is
    soldered to a motherboard, versus being on a separate plug-in card.
    Other than that, I don't know why that digit is different.

    Sometimes, you can find another Asus motherboard with Marvell storage
    on it, and get a driver from there. It appears the Asus ftp site is
    gone, so I can't offer "browsing" to find the best one :-(

    http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=P8P67+DELUXE&p=1&s=39

    That gets me this one. The internal date stamp is 2011-09-02, while
    the Asus page shows a 2012 date.

    http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb...ell91xx_WinXP_V1201006_VistaWin7_V1201010.zip

    I can find a slightly later one here, but still not the 1019 one.
    Internal folder date stamp 2011-12-16.

    http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=P9X79+PRO&p=1&s=42

    http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/misc/sata/Marvell_V1201014_XPVistaWin7.zip

    I was trying to get the driver off an Asus site, as I don't know
    how trustworthy the station-driver site is (never used it).

    You could try a different driver version, and see if that
    helps the stability.

    The 9128 apparently has a single PCI Express lane on the
    chip, meaning it's likely to support one SSD well. And
    benchmarks measure in at around ~400MB/sec or so. They
    never quite make it further than that. An Intel Southbridge
    might do a bit better, and lots of new boards should
    have 4xSATA II + 2xSATA III as their Southbridge config.

    One reason they might not want to put too many III ports,
    is the hub bus between the Southbridge and the processor,
    has limited bandwidth. And they wouldn't want some
    customer trying 6xRAID0 at 500MB/sec per SSD and
    not getting the 3GB/sec transfer rate they were
    expecting. Limiting the number of ports, is to
    reduce people's expectations caused by the hub bus.
    The hub bus does power a number of things, and if
    a user was careful, they might max out that bus.
    (But how many people run a disk benchmark in the
    background, while playing a 3D game. Some of the
    scenarios have to be artificially constructed,
    and at this point in time, aren't realistic in
    how people would normally use a computer.)

    If you want a new motherboard, it shouldn't be hard
    to find one with a native SATA III.

    Paul

    Many thanks for your time researching :)
    I feel a little less inclined to try different drivers so
    I guess I will need to plod along with what I have at present although I
    don't see me keeping to that.
    I`m forever seeming to upgrade I guess!
    So do you think there might be a better Asus board I should definitely
    consider?
    Regards.
    Stuart.
     
    srt, May 9, 2012
    #3
  4. srt

    Paul Guest

    You can go to Newegg, select motherboards, select Intel, select
    the "socket" of the processor. And that should narrow the
    search down. Then, in the output of the search, sort the
    results by "customer rating". That will give you some
    good candidates to research further. Since so many boards
    will have those two Intel SATA III ports, you should have
    many boards to choose from.

    Before buying the board, you can visit support.asus.com and
    download a user manual and use the "CPU Support" web page,
    to verify the board takes your processor. That also gives an
    opportunity to verify the RAM types are the same or whatever.

    One reason for reading customer reviews, is to discover boards
    which have nagging problems experienced by many. The customer
    reviews are a "skewed statistic", but they still give you
    a general feeling for failures.

    You don't have to buy the motherboard from Newegg, but you
    can use them for their "data-mining" potential.

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 9, 2012
    #4
  5. srt

    Paul Guest

    You can go to Newegg, select motherboards, select Intel, select
    the "socket" of the processor. And that should narrow the
    search down. Then, in the output of the search, sort the
    results by "customer rating". That will give you some
    good candidates to research further. Since so many boards
    will have those two Intel SATA III ports, you should have
    many boards to choose from.

    Before buying the board, you can visit support.asus.com and
    download a user manual and use the "CPU Support" web page,
    to verify the board takes your processor. That also gives an
    opportunity to verify the RAM types are the same or whatever.

    One reason for reading customer reviews, is to discover boards
    which have nagging problems experienced by many. The customer
    reviews are a "skewed statistic", but they still give you
    a general feeling for failures.

    You don't have to buy the motherboard from Newegg, but you
    can use them for their "data-mining" potential.

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 9, 2012
    #5
  6. srt

    srt Guest

    "Paul" wrote in message
    You can go to Newegg, select motherboards, select Intel, select
    the "socket" of the processor. And that should narrow the
    search down. Then, in the output of the search, sort the
    results by "customer rating". That will give you some
    good candidates to research further. Since so many boards
    will have those two Intel SATA III ports, you should have
    many boards to choose from.

    Before buying the board, you can visit support.asus.com and
    download a user manual and use the "CPU Support" web page,
    to verify the board takes your processor. That also gives an
    opportunity to verify the RAM types are the same or whatever.

    One reason for reading customer reviews, is to discover boards
    which have nagging problems experienced by many. The customer
    reviews are a "skewed statistic", but they still give you
    a general feeling for failures.

    You don't have to buy the motherboard from Newegg, but you
    can use them for their "data-mining" potential.

    Paul

    Ok -- thanks - - yes I see what you mean :)
    I have done similar with Amazon although their system is not so adaptable as
    the Newegg one.
    The other thing it throws up is I will prly need a new processor - - and a
    bigger bank balance!

    Stuart.
     
    srt, May 10, 2012
    #6
  7. srt

    geoff Guest

    Are most boards going to perform the same given the same specs? That means
    two boards have:
    - SATA III
    - DDR3
    - Same CPU socket
    - Same bus speed

    The differences might be multiple PCIe slots for SLI, but ignoring SLI, it
    seems that boards perform roughly the same.

    I ask because, in the 80s, the Compaq DeskPro 40 blew away the IBM/AT big
    time and others said it had a better memory controller, etc.

    --g
     
    geoff, May 13, 2012
    #7
  8. srt

    Paul Guest

    When you look at review articles now, the bars in the bar charts
    are all the same length.

    So the motherboards are "boringly the same".

    Not like in the old days, when there were so many noticeable
    bottlenecks in the designs.

    The memory controller now, is inside the processor, so there
    is no room for differentiation there.

    Paul
     
    Paul, May 13, 2012
    #8
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