Upgrading MacbookPro disk

Discussion in 'Apple' started by JF Mezei, Dec 19, 2013.

  1. JF Mezei

    JF Mezei Guest

    I have a 2009 MacBook Pro (13")

    160 gig drive. And it is getting full.

    If I wish to upgrade the disk, what should I be looking for (and where
    is it recommened ?)

    What sort of capacity is possible/safe in that form factor ?

    Are some drives more power hungry than others ?


    In terms of data transfer: sanity check please:

    Boot from CD
    Connect to my server over AFP.
    Disk Util, do a disk image of the laptop drive to a .DMG on server
    Replace drive
    Boot from CD
    Disk Util, restore from that .DMG


    Does the Snow Leopard CD allow me to do AFP connections ? Or is the
    software too limited for that ?
     
    JF Mezei, Dec 19, 2013
    #1
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  2. JF Mezei

    Guest Guest

    any 9mm laptop sata drive will work.
    1 tb, but you ought to consider an ssd. not as much capacity for the
    dollar but a shitload faster.
    not significantly, but the 7200 rpm drives are noisier.
    it'll be a *lot* faster to clone it to a locally attached drive.
     
    Guest, Dec 19, 2013
    #2
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  3. JF Mezei

    John Albert Guest

    I'd suggest a 256gb SSD.

    That's not an overly big increase size-wise, but above that
    capacity SSD's get expensive quickly.

    As for how to do the transfer, I'd suggest a USB3/SATA
    docking station, such as this:
    http://plugable.com/products/USB3-SATA-U3
    or this:
    http://plugable.com/products/pss-dd1
    They are very affordable and very easy to use.

    The latter is a dual-bay 2.5" dock, could come in useful for
    numerous drive-related tasks. Including a way to access the
    old drive after it's removed.

    Then, put the new drive in the dock
    Plug it into the MacBook
    Use CarbonCopyCloner (free to download and use for 30 days)
    to clone the contents of the internal to the new drive in
    the dock
    Do a test boot using the "option" key to invoke the startup
    manager during boot time, and..
    .... if the boot is successful, open the MacBook and do the
    drive swap.
     
    John Albert, Dec 20, 2013
    #3
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