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Using a Intel 82845G with a 16:9 Aspect Ratio on WinXP

Discussion in 'Intel' started by TomRossi7, May 16, 2005.

  1. TomRossi7

    TomRossi7 Guest

    I am using onboard video, Intel 82845G, on a Dell P4. I cannot figure
    out how to get it to run in any 16:9 Aspect Ratios. I'm considering
    getting a flat screen that runs at 1366 x 768, but think it may be a
    waste of money if I can't support it.

    Unfortunately, it is onboard with no AGP slot, so I can't just do a
    simple upgrade.

    Thanks,
    Tom
     
    TomRossi7, May 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. TomRossi7

    Yousuf Khan Guest

    I don't think you have much to worry about. I could be wrong but I don't
    think so; as soon as your install a 16:9 monitor to your video card it
    autodetects it and automatically enables the 16:9 display modes.

    Yousuf Khan
     
    Yousuf Khan, May 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. Which "Dell P4" (Dells computers usually have model numbers that might
    help people to help You)...
    It's possible that the gfx drivers simply don't support any widescreen
    resolutions at all...
    Sure You can. Just get a PCI (not PCIe!) Geforce card (even an old GF2MX
    would do it!), and You're set with widescreen...

    But be aware that 1366x768 is a very uncommon resolution. Usual
    widescreen resolutions are 1280x800, 1600x1024, 1680x1050 etc..

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, May 16, 2005
    #3
  4. TomRossi7

    Smarty Guest

    I have several Dell P4s which I use as widescreen 16:9 TV "clients" in a
    SageTV network in my home. The onboard Intel chipset cannot drive 16:9
    resolutions. The suggestion to add a cheap video card is a good one. I found
    ATI cards with DVI output for about 20 bucks apiece which work beautifully.
    They are AGP for my Poweredge SC400's and Dimension 4600, but they also make
    PCI versions for Dells which lack an AGP slot. These PCI versions are
    actually a couple bucks cheaper at $18.

    I bought these gradually as I added Sage TV setups in bedrooms, kitchen,
    exercise room, kitchen, etc. There are 9200LE Rage as I recall. There are
    plenty of discontinued and low cost cards which will work well, especially
    if you are not also trying to get fast 3D performance for games, etc.

    Smarty
     
    Smarty, May 16, 2005
    #4
  5. TomRossi7

    TomRossi7 Guest

    TomRossi7, May 16, 2005
    #5
  6. TomRossi7

    GeekFunk Guest

    Well, a cheap PCI card might not do the trick with a WMCE 2005 box.

    WMCE requires a graphics card that supports DirectX 9. I doubt that a
    $20 card will meet the requirements of DirectX 9.
     
    GeekFunk, May 16, 2005
    #6
  7. TomRossi7

    DaveW Guest

    That older motherboard with ON-Board video cannot run 16:9 video.
     
    DaveW, May 17, 2005
    #7
  8. TomRossi7

    TomRossi7 Guest

    Yeah, currently I'm running XP MCE 2004 because I couldn't get 2005 to
    run with the onboard video. I certainly don't have a PCI Express slot.
    I wonder if I can get a Radeon PCI or GeForce PCI card to work with my
    MCE 2004?
     
    TomRossi7, May 17, 2005
    #8
  9. TomRossi7

    Jukka Aho Guest

    If the manufacturer's drivers do not have a suitable graphics mode for
    the 16:9 display and do not allow defining a custom graphics mode with
    custom timings on your own, you might want to give a shot to a third
    party utility called "PowerStrip":

    <http://www.entechtaiwan.net/util/ps.shtm>

    It may or may not support the video chip integrated on your motherboard.
    Worth a try, anyway.
     
    Jukka Aho, May 17, 2005
    #9
  10. TomRossi7

    Ted Miller Guest

    Ignore those comments. Windows s perfectly happy driving 1366x768 -- I do it
    every day from an nVidia 5900 to a plasma panel with 1366x768 native
    resolution, via DVI. The control panel immediately and straightforwardly
    offered a resolution of 1360x768, and it all works perfectly.

    In fact this is preferable to some of those resolutions that people say are
    more "standard" because those other resolutions do not have square pixels,
    but 1366x768 does. Rectangluar pixels can cause all sorts of headaches. At
    1360x768 both your desktop and TV will work perfectly.
     
    Ted Miller, May 17, 2005
    #10
  11. TomRossi7

    Ted Miller Guest

    Ted Miller, May 17, 2005
    #11
  12. TomRossi7

    Smarty Guest

    I use an nVidia FX5200 on my Dell and sure enough, the 16:9 displays I try
    all work well (and I have tried 3 different 16:9 displays). Without the
    nVidia card and its drivers, the internal Intel chipset CANNOT drive these
    displays.

    Therefore, I suggest that ignoring the other comments is a BAD suggestion.

    Smarty
     
    Smarty, May 17, 2005
    #12
  13. TomRossi7

    Ted Miller Guest

    I meant he should ignore the comments about 1366x768 being a "strange"
    resolution, etc.

    If a video card supports 16:9 at all, 1366x768 shouldn't be a problem.
     
    Ted Miller, May 18, 2005
    #13
  14. TomRossi7

    Dave Emerson Guest

    No *that's* an interesting utility. It might be just what I need for
    another project I have in mind...

    Thanks Jukka
     
    Dave Emerson, May 18, 2005
    #14
  15. TomRossi7

    TomRossi7 Guest

    Thanks for the reply. I've gone ahead and installed Powerstrip, but
    under display profiles - configure, it does not list 1366x768 as an
    option. How can I add this option?
     
    TomRossi7, May 21, 2005
    #15
  16. TomRossi7

    shooking

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2010
    Messages:
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    Bizarre "splution" to INTEL 82845 widescreen

    I have scoured the internet for "how to" use widescreen graphics on INTEL 82845 integrated graphics.
    Mine is in a DELL Optiplex GX260 with 64MB integrated INTEL 82845.

    I found my "solution" by accident.

    I have on older SAMSUNG SyncMaster 2032BW 20" with integrated analog TV.
    I bought a newer SAMSUNG P2270HD black Flat Panel TV (digital TV 1080p) as an Xmas present for my wife to give her wider screen for her course work (currently on a 1024x768 panel) on the DELL Optiplex GX260.

    This only has VGA output (no DVI and certainly no HDMI).

    Basically 2270 refused to work in widescreen. Even when I installed the samsung drivers (with the most up to date intel drivers).

    I was then in search for 4xAGP (yeah right!) or PCI graphics card that could handle widescreen.

    Ultimately, I got a bit confused, and accidentally plugged in the 2032.
    Imagine my surprise when it offered me 1680x1050 at both 75Hz or 60Hz in high colour,
    and 60Hz in true colour.

    Once I had "set" this resolution, I could plug the 2270 back in and yes it clearly displayed in 1680x1050@60Hz (it also offered me 1600x1200 which is odd since monitor can only do 1920x1080p).
    I didnt like the 1600x1200 (odd on a 16:10 monitor).

    When I rebooted, the 2270 refused to work in 1680x1050 and came up instead in 1280x1024.

    So, I replaced monitor with 2032 and reset the resolution to 1680x1050@60Hz and
    decided to use the newer 2270 on my computer with DVI cable at full 1920x1080@60Hz

    All this to say the answer about "what happens if you plug the new monitor into the VGA slot on the 82845?".

    ANSWER: Depends on your monitor (I always used same cable).

    Quirky, but probably intuitive to someone somewhere.

    Hope this helps someone.

    Regards

    Steve H

    PS you can guess the Xmas present was turned into "You knew this all along .. you just wanted a new monitor for yourself!". I flatly refute that allegation. I did, however, steal the 1024x768 as a 2nd monitor for my PC to I can run cubase in that window, and other apps in new 22" monitor!
    Turned out nice again.
     
    shooking, Jan 2, 2010
    #16
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