Video Editing Precision 380 -vs- XPS 600

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Guest, Dec 6, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I am sort of considering buying a powerful
    box to use for video editing. My son is doing
    quite a bit of it, and I am starting to learn
    too.

    I was considering a precision 380, and noticed
    they carry a whole different class of video card.

    They do not have a lot of memory, the memory is
    not particularly fast, and they cost a whole lot.

    What is one paying for with these cards? They
    seem to be PCI-Express, as in the Dim XPS-600.

    Would these have more powerful rendering engines
    that Premiere Pro could use?

    For video editing with Adobe products, would there
    be a clear advantage to either the XPS-600 or the
    Pre-380?

    Thanks,
     
    Guest, Dec 6, 2005
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Jay B Guest

    In my opinion,
    the 380 would be adequate for you than the xps 600.
    the first thing about the 600 would be the noise coming from the 5 fans
    on board. and the extra heat it gives off. if you have the environment
    for this, great! the xps600 is really the same box as the prcision 670.

    I'm not thrilled with the video card selection in precision either. they
    are geared towards business needs.
    get the cheapest card that comes in the package and then go buy an addon
    card to your specs. that's what i did.
    i'm not sure i see your complaint about the memory in the 380. its
    beautiful high speed memory.

    you should look at also the optiplex gx620, get it as a 3.4 processor,
    could also handle anything you throw at it. and a better price point
    than the precision. that is what i would pick in your case.
     
    Jay B, Dec 6, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Jay B writes:

    Jay> In my opinion,
    Jay> the 380 would be adequate for you than the xps 600.
    Jay> the first thing about the 600 would be the noise coming from the 5
    Jay> fans on board. and the extra heat it gives off. if you have the
    Jay> environment for this, great! the xps600 is really the same box as the
    Jay> prcision 670.

    The Precision 670 takes Xeon chips, and will take two dual
    core. That is, I believe, quite different than the xps600,
    which can take one dual core (or non-dual core) Pentium chip.

    Jay> I'm not thrilled with the video card selection in precision
    Jay> either. they are geared towards business needs.
    Jay> get the cheapest card that comes in the package and then go buy an
    Jay> addon card to your specs. that's what i did.
    Jay> i'm not sure i see your complaint about the memory in the 380. its
    Jay> beautiful high speed memory.

    I was referring to the video memory, comparing to the
    video cards in the XPS-600. Similar speeds, much more
    expensive. I figured the money must be buying something.

    Jay> you should look at also the optiplex gx620, get it as a 3.4 processor,
    Jay> could also handle anything you throw at it. and a better price point
    Jay> than the precision. that is what i would pick in your case.


     
    Guest, Dec 6, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    User N Guest

    Yeah, workstation cards vs desktop/gaming cards.
    Looks like dual heads for dual monitors, and in at least one case,
    dual dual-link DVI outputs for two extra high resolution displays.
    Beyond that I'm not sure of the differences between the two classes
    of cards. Off the top of my head I'd guess that with games, very high
    frame rates are required but image accuracy isn't terribly important.
    Whereas with professional work, image quality is crucial and frame
    rates need not be so high. I would assume that with game boards the
    focus is on DirectX and game performance, whereas with workstation
    boards it would be OpenGL and professional apps. A bit of googling
    would probably shed some light on the subject and turn up at least a
    few head to head comparisons between workstation and gaming
    cards.
    I'm not familiar with PP and all that you can do with it, let alone how
    it utilizes the GPU. I'd probably check the system requirements and
    recommendations for it and its various updates, plugins, etc. Plus
    google for related forums... video editing forums... to see if the topic
    has been discussed and anyone provided usefull info.
     
    User N, Dec 7, 2005
    #4
  5. The Precision 380 is a workstation class machine (albeit entry level) --
    this is almost certainly overkill for what you are doing. The price
    premium that comes with workstations is because they are ISV certified
    for programs like AutoCAD. They use very pricey graphics cards that are
    sometimes even slower than gaming oriented cards, this is because they
    are designed for specific purposes (and guaranteed to do that task
    well). Workstations tend to be geared more towards people doing CAD
    work where having a line drawn at a specific angle to the thousandth of
    a degree is more important (eg. Structural Engineers, etc.) than speed.
    This isn't to say workstations are slow, but often the premium in
    price doesn't buy you any processing power. Your money would be better
    spent going to the best dual core system you can afford with 2-3GB of
    non-ECC RAM. Regarding your last question (will the 380's graphics card
    give you a boost), I'm not certain but from what I understand a couple
    plugins can offload part of their work to GPU's. This is very video
    card & plugin specific, so you'll have to look them up.
     
    Nicholas Andrade, Dec 7, 2005
    #5
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