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What is the difference of DDR and DUAL DDR Memory

Discussion in 'AMD Thunderbird' started by Roger Keillor, Aug 30, 2003.

  1. Hi,

    I am curious about DDR/Dual DDR memory.

    I know nothing about it and and having trouble getting a clear answer to
    some questions I have.

    1) What is the difference between the two?
    2) can DUAL DDR work with only one 512MB Stick or does it require two 256MB
    Sticks?
    3) Is there special memory or can any DDR 3200 stick be used?

    Any and all information pertaining to this would be great

    Thanks
    Roger
     
    Roger Keillor, Aug 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. Roger Keillor

    S.Heenan Guest

    DDR, Double Data Rate is a form of SDRAM, similar to the older PC133. The
    difference is that DDR can send data twice per clock cycle, rather than once
    with SDR SDRAM.

    Motherboards and chipsets supporting dual-channel DDR will work fine with
    one module. Memory bandwidth can be increased with the use of two or more
    modules.

    Any decent quality DDR memory can be used in dual-channel configuration.
    With prices of PC3200(200MHz) and PC2700(166MHz) and PC2100(133MHz) being
    within a few dollars, PC3200 is the way to go.

    To add to the confusion, DDR II should be out sometime in 2004. It will
    probably be backward compatible with current 184 pin DDR modules.
     
    S.Heenan, Aug 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. Roger Keillor

    Tone-EQ Guest

    1) What is the difference between the two?

    It's similar to the old "two-way interleaving". Obviously dual DDR will give
    you a slight increase in performance, as it helps to increase the
    bandwidth, but it may be as little as 5-10%, if that.
    You'll need two (dual). Can be two of anything, as long as they are the same
    (2 x 256Mb, 2 x 512Mb). You'll have to refer to the motherboard manual to
    find out which two DIMM slots to use, as some boards can be picky.
    Any speed can be used (2100, 2700, etc.) Some manufacturers test two sticks
    and package them together (e.g. Corsair TwinX), but depending on brand
    and/or quality, any old memory may work. I use 2 separately purchased
    Samsung 512Mb PC3200 sticks on an A7N8X board without any problems at all.

    --
    Regards,
    Tony. (tony.cue(at)tiscali.co.uk)

    Discogs: building the definitive database of electronic music...
    http://www.discogs.com

    Asus A7N8X Deluxe (Revision 1.04, BIOS 1004)
    AMD AthlonXP 2400+ @ 2800+ (TBred-B, 13.5 x 166, 1.7VCore)
    1Gb (2 x 512) Samsung PC3200 400Mhz DDR RAM (M368L6423DTM/CC400)
     
    Tone-EQ, Aug 30, 2003
    #3
  4. However, Dual DDR doesn't work more efficiently in athlon's motherboards. If
    you want to use efficiently the dual channel, you must have a pentium
    motherboard with i875 or i865 chipsets and a microprocessor with 800 mhz of
    FSB.
     
    Miguel A. Muñoz, Aug 31, 2003
    #4
  5. Roger Keillor

    Wes Newell Guest

    First things first. No Intel cpu has a FSB over 200MHz (unless you
    overclock it). The data rate is however twice that of a similarly clocked
    fsb on the Athlon. The FSB width is the same for both the Athlon and P4
    afaik. Neither CPU's benefit much from a dual channel ddr unless you have
    something using the extra data of the memory bus. In the Athlon MB with on
    board video, that would be the case. In the P4, assuming the chipset can
    handle it, one could see the benefit to the cpu since the cpu's FSB is
    quad pumped (QDR). Now dual DDR ram would equal QDR thus allowing the full
    bandwidth of the fsb. Even with this, the benefit isn't as much as you
    would think since many data accesses never actually go to the DDR ram for
    their data, but get it from one of the cpu caches. This leaves all that
    bandwidth only useful in certain applications.
    So bandwidth benchmarks don't really mean squat in real world
    applications. Probably why the single channel nf2 400 chipset outperforms
    the nf2 ultra 400 dual channel chipset in most applications benchmarks.

    IOW's don't be concerned with dual channel with AMD unless you have on
    board video. There, it does make a difference, giving the video faster
    access to the ram.
     
    Wes Newell, Aug 31, 2003
    #5
  6. Roger Keillor

    Pug Fugley Guest

    Wow, are YOU misinformed.
     
    Pug Fugley, Aug 31, 2003
    #6
  7. Roger Keillor

    Ben Pope Guest

    What he said was probably not far off real life, unless you use onboard
    graphics. Oh. and the 533 Intel boards are quad too.

    Ben
     
    Ben Pope, Sep 1, 2003
    #7
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