What the...??? Anybody seen this before?

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Roger, Jul 14, 2004.

  1. Roger

    Roger Guest

    I was just receiving some email and chatting with an IM app and all of a
    sudden got a grey translucent rectangle pops on my screen with the
    message "You must restart your computer," in english and a few other
    languages.
    Everything was paralyzed, including Force quit, and indeed it did have
    to be restarted.

    When I did restart the mailbox I was in flagged all my read mail unread.
    That's the only repercussion I've noticed thus far..

    10.3.4, iBook 600.

    Rog
     
    Roger, Jul 14, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Roger

    Chas Guest

    It's called a kernel panic. It means that the OS itself has gone
    titsup.com, usual causes being a duff kernel extension or dodgy RAM.

    =:~)
     
    Chas, Jul 14, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Roger

    Guest Guest

    That's a "kernel panic".

    <http://www.macmaps.com/kernelpanic.html>

    Have you recently installed anything weird?
     
    Guest, Jul 14, 2004
    #3
  4. Roger

    noman Guest

    You now know what this is, from previous responses.

    Did you install memory recently? Bad memory can cause kernel panics.
     
    noman, Jul 14, 2004
    #4
  5. Roger

    Roger Guest

    Hmm, no this memory's a few years old...

    Rog
     
    Roger, Jul 15, 2004
    #5
  6. Roger

    Roger Guest

    So THAT's a kernal panic. Why's it have to panic? Can't it just have a
    mild anxiety attack?

    Thanks for the info,

    Rog
     
    Roger, Jul 15, 2004
    #6
  7. Roger

    Geo Guest

    Advertising gimmick, methinks. "It's not a crash, OSX doesn't crash,
    it's just a kernel panic. Vevvy, vevvy, different" :)

    The prophylactic screen of death (my favorite name for it) doesn't
    only happen from a hardware fault. It's relatively easy to overload
    OSX to the point where it throws it up. I can take a perfect Mac, set
    it to download 10 - 20,000 binaries from a few big newsgroups (takes
    an hour on cable to rake the files all in) and bingo, more often than
    not, the screen will appear before the download is complete.

    I don't know about you, but my Mac DOES seem to have anxiety attacks,
    already. I cannot leave it alone on a task for more than 3 minutes, it
    will chime after me for some or other reason. My girlfriend already
    mocks it with "Honey, your wife is calling you again. She's jealous!"
     
    Geo, Jul 15, 2004
    #7
  8. Roger

    Kyle Jones Guest

    Ever feel for your wallet after you've been bumped in a crowd?
    Or looked around for your youngster as you stroll through a
    shopping mall? In those cases you know what state things ought
    to be in (wallet safely in pocket or purse, youngster close by
    and in plain sight). If you find that things are different, you
    panic.

    The kernel knows that some of its variables should have particular
    values in a system that is running properly. If any of those
    variables have unexpected values, then the system is by definition
    in an incorrect state. In that case the kernel "panics",
    i.e. stops runnning very quickly. The urgency is because if
    a broken system keeps running it might corrupt your data or in
    some rare cases actually damage the system hardware. It is also
    easier for a programmer to debug a system that stops itself
    immediately when it detects trouble, which means system bugs will
    be fixed faster.
     
    Kyle Jones, Jul 15, 2004
    #8
  9. Not. It's been called a kernel panic long before OS X. It is, of
    course, a type of crash.
    What exactly are you "setting it up" with?
     
    Matthew Russotto, Jul 15, 2004
    #9
  10. Naughty boy! You satiated your Mac!
     
    Walter Bushell, Jul 15, 2004
    #10
  11. Roger

    Király Guest

    I've only had one kernel panic. I had read in a magazine how I could use
    sudo shutdown in the terminal to schedule a power down. I entered the
    command to schedule a power down in an hour, then entered the command
    again to shutdown immediately, to see if it would remember the first
    command after I powered it up again.

    After I entered the second command, the system got really slow, and
    then got the screen of death. Worse of all, it wouldn't boot again. Had
    to reinstall the OS. This was under 10.2.1, IIRC.

    K.
     
    Király, Jul 18, 2004
    #11
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.