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What the heck is the diff between PCI and PEG ?

Discussion in 'Nvidia' started by johns, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. johns

    johns Guest

    PEG is called PCI Express Graphics, and I have 2
    selections in my mobo BIOS ... PCI or PEG ???
    The mobo is for Core 2 Duo, and the video card is
    a BFG 8800 GT/GTO. Default setting seems to be
    PCI, and I left it that way. System runs fine. I
    benched Aquamark3D at 151,233 .. plenty fast.

    johns
     
    johns, Mar 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. johns

    peter Guest

    here is an explanation
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCI_Express

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peripheral_Component_Interconnect


    in your case the "PEG' just stands for PCI EXPRESS......Whereas PCI an
    handle more than Video...but so can PCI-E nowadays
    The Connectors are different ...that 8800 you use is a PCI-E card and would
    not fit in a PCI slot.
    By setting your mobo to PCI just means that the BIOS will look for a Video
    card on the PCI slot 1st and finding none will then look at the PCI-E slot.
    peter
     
    peter, Mar 4, 2008
    #2
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  3. johns

    johns Guest

    Jargon mongers. Wonder why they just don't
    call it PCI or PCIE ? Would make more sense,
    and not seem to imply something weird.

    Thanks.

    johns
     
    johns, Mar 4, 2008
    #3
  4. * johns:
    PEG (PCI Express Graphics) -> generic PCI Express 16x slot (called PEG
    because only gfx cards need the 16x bandwith)

    The selection in the BIOS setup is for choosing the primary display
    adapter if you have more than one gfx card in your computer (with one
    PEG slot you can have one PCI Express gfx card and one PCI gfx card).
    That's the same like the "AGP"/"PCI" setting in the BIOS setup of
    AGP-based computers which also was there for choosing the primary gfx
    adapter. If you only have one gfx card this setting is irrelevant.

    I wonder why someone who claimed to develop drivers for Nvidia and doing
    administration of dozens of PCs for a company doesn't even know the
    most basic things. But then, you're bullshitter-johns.

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 5, 2008
    #4
  5. johns

    johns Guest

    In my history of 10,000 mobos, I have never seen the
    term PEG used in the BIOS .. until now, with this
    Core 2 duo mobo. Obviously, PEG is just jargon,
    and they had no valid reason to put this crap in
    the BIOS .. other than they are an arrogant pack
    of morons trying to impress those out there who
    think jargon is the same thing as knowledge.
    I see you know all about PEG. I will simply pick
    up the phone, and chew Gigabyte tech-support
    out, and make them change it to PCIE.

    johns
     
    johns, Mar 5, 2008
    #5
  6. johns

    Ian D Guest

    Asus also uses PEG. The choices in BIOS are PEG/PCI
    and PCI/PEG. The problem is that they don't explain
    the meaning of PEG on the manual page for those
    settings. Maybe they thought it would be too confusing
    to use PCIE/PCI.
     
    Ian D, Mar 6, 2008
    #6
  7. * johns:
    Nope, shithead, it's not. PEG is an standardized term and can be found
    in the PCI Express specifications.
    You speaking about knowledge is like a blind man speaking of colors.
    Yeah, sure. Next you tell us that you develop their BIOSes, right?

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 6, 2008
    #7
  8. * Ian D:
    No. The reason for using the term "PEG" simply is because some standard
    mobos support gfx only in the PEG slot and not in all PCIe slots.

    Benjamin
     
    Benjamin Gawert, Mar 6, 2008
    #8
  9. johns

    DRS Guest

    Quite right. The BIOS on my 939-based ASUS motherboard refers to PEG and
    it's not explained in the manual.
     
    DRS, Mar 6, 2008
    #9
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