What To Do About My Old Digital Camera - Old USB?

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Von Fourche, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Von Fourche

    Von Fourche Guest

    Another question lol:

    One thing that I am heavily into is taking pictures with my digital
    camera and putting them on my computer and e-mailing them to friends and
    family.

    Ok, I got my digital camera about one year after I got my old computer
    (five years ago.) So all my old computer USB outlets are old USB. My
    camera came with a USB/camera cable but it's old USB.

    So what do I do now? My new Dell has those new USB 2 sockets. Are old
    USB and new USB compatible? Can I even stick an old USB cable into a USB
    socket? Will it fit? Are there any go-between connectors?

    Much Thanks!
     
    Von Fourche, Dec 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. Von Fourche

    BigJim Guest

    it will work with the old usb
     
    BigJim, Dec 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. The "old USB" is USB 1.1 and the newer version is USB 2.0; USB 2.0 is
    backwards compatible but the transfer rates are limited to USB 1.1
    speeds (12Mbps, which I doubt your camera could put out). What type of
    flash memory does your camera use? I'm going to guess either
    CompactFlash or Sony MemoryStick (that's what my old camera from 2001
    uses). For just about any type of standard flash memory, the fastest
    way to transfer pictures from the camera is going to be picking up a USB
    2.0 memory card reader, taking the card froout of the camera, and
    inserting it into the reader which you will use to transfer its contents
    to the PC. Unless you have some really odd proprietary camera, you
    should most likely be able to find a USB 2.0 flash memory read for under
    $20 at Frys or Best Buy. There's no benefit in transfering the pictures
    via the camera (again, this presumes it stores the pictures in standard
    JPEG formamt on the memory card).
     
    Nicholas Andrade, Dec 30, 2005
    #3
  4. Von Fourche

    S.P. Guest

    For just about any type of standard flash memory, the fastest
    That's been my findings, too. Even a fast camera was slower than the USB
    2.0 reader.
     
    S.P., Dec 30, 2005
    #4
  5. Von Fourche

    RRR_News Guest

    Von Fourche,
    Since you got a new Dell. You may want to go to the camera's manufacturer's website, and see if there are any driver/software updates for that camera being connected to a XP PC.

    --

    Rich/rerat

    (RRR News) <message rule>
    <<Previous Text Snipped to Save Bandwidth When Appropriate>>




    Another question lol:

    One thing that I am heavily into is taking pictures with my digital
    camera and putting them on my computer and e-mailing them to friends and
    family.

    Ok, I got my digital camera about one year after I got my old computer
    (five years ago.) So all my old computer USB outlets are old USB. My
    camera came with a USB/camera cable but it's old USB.

    So what do I do now? My new Dell has those new USB 2 sockets. Are old
    USB and new USB compatible? Can I even stick an old USB cable into a USB
    socket? Will it fit? Are there any go-between connectors?

    Much Thanks!
     
    RRR_News, Dec 30, 2005
    #5
  6. Von Fourche

    alien Guest

    ....snip
    Never say never. I have a Kodak DC220 that can record audio clips. If you
    don't use the USB cable, you can't "see" the audio clips. They must be
    embedded in the jpgs somehow. I bought that camera in 1998 and it still
    works although it's been replaced with a newer model that takes videos too.

    alien
     
    alien, Jan 3, 2006
    #6
  7. Von Fourche

    Tom Scales Guest

    Actually, I wrote a program, many years ago, that would pull the audio clips
    out of the files (220, 260, 290). You could copy the files using a card
    reader and then extract the audio. Not even sure I have it anymore, but if
    you're dying to have it.....
     
    Tom Scales, Jan 3, 2006
    #7
  8. I presume you missed the part in parentheses; although the clip you
    described may have been JPEG compliant, I wouldn't call it "standard".
    Yes there are special cases where transferring via the camera may be
    important, but it's virtually always not the case when dealing with
    standard graphical files.
     
    Nicholas Andrade, Jan 4, 2006
    #8
  9. Von Fourche

    Tom Scales Guest

    It's still a 'standard' jpeg file. The jpeg standard allows from broad
    interpretation and they are still standard
     
    Tom Scales, Jan 4, 2006
    #9
  10. I guess it wasn't clear; I didn't say a, "JPEG which meets the standards
    of the format," but rather a "standard JPEG format". I was using
    standard as in "regularly and widely used", not "meeting what is
    required in the format" (for that I used the word compliant).
     
    Nicholas Andrade, Jan 4, 2006
    #10
  11. Von Fourche

    Tom Scales Guest

    I'm just being picky, but you're redefining the word standard to fit your
    argument.
     
    Tom Scales, Jan 4, 2006
    #11
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