Whats the diff between "agp 8x" & "agp 8x pro"?

Discussion in 'Abit' started by David. E. Goble, Oct 30, 2003.

  1. Hi all;

    Simple question: whats the difference between Agp 8x and Agp 8x Pro?

    Do the lastest cards ie the ATI radeon 9800 take any advantage of the
    agp 8x pro slot?
     
    David. E. Goble, Oct 30, 2003
    #1
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  2. David. E. Goble

    0_Qed Guest

    TomG mite really know ... most Gamers track this kinda stuff.

    My =swag= is "Probably" (P);

    P = possibility it works
    1-P = possibility it cooks something


    I was "about" to upgrade when I came across this 'spec' comparison ...
    gave up ... stuck with whot I got ...
    ( sorry, I didnt grab the URL also ) :

    ....................................
    AGP Specs (1.0, 2.0, AGP Pro, 3.0)
    AGP 1.0
    Modes
    · 1x (266Mbps) (8 bytes per two clock cycles)
    · 2x (533Mbps) (8 bytes per clock cycle)
    Connectors
    · AGP 3.3v keyed
    AGP 2.0
    AGP 2.0 Specification
    Modes
    · 1x (266Mbps) (8 bytes per two clock cycles)
    · 2x (533Mbps) (8 bytes per clock cycle)
    · 4x (1.07Gbps) (16 bytes per clock cycle)
    Connectors
    · AGP 3.3v keyed
    · AGP 1.5v keyed
    · AGP UNIVERSAL (supports both 3.3v and 1.5v
    cards)
    AGP Pro
    AGP Pro, is primarily designed to deliver
    additional electrical power to the
    graphics add-in cards to meet the needs of
    advanced workstation graphics. AGP Pro
    will accept AGP 1.0 and 2.0 cards depending on
    the connector used on the
    motherboard.
    AGP Pro 1.0 Specification
    AGP Pro 1.1a Specification
    Modes
    · 1x (266Mbps) (8 bytes per two clock cycles)
    · 2x (533Mbps) (8 bytes per clock cycle)
    · 4x (1.07Gbps) (16 bytes per clock cycle)
    Connectors
    · AGP Pro 3.3v keyed
    · AGP Pro 1.5v keyed
    · AGP Pro UNIVERSAL (supports both 3.3v and 1.5v
    cards)
    AGP 3.0 (Draft)
    AGP3.0 offers a significant increase in
    performance along with feature
    enhancements to AGP2.0. This interface represents
    the natural evolution from the
    existing AGP to meet the ever-increasing demands
    placed on the graphic interfaces
    within the workstation and desktop environments.
    AGP Pro 3.0 Draft
    Modes
    · 1x (266Mbps) (8 bytes per two clock cycles)
    · 2x (533Mbps) (8 bytes per clock cycle)
    · 4x (1.07Gbps) (16 bytes per clock cycle)
    · 8x (2.1Gbps) (32 bytes per clock cycle)
    Connectors
    · AGP 1.5v keyed
    · AGP Pro 1.5v keyed
    While AGP 3.0 spec uses existing AGP 2.0 and AGP
    Pro 1.5v connectors, this does
    not mean you can use an AGP 3.0 card on a AGP 2.0
    motherboard, you cannot. What
    is does mean is that some AGP 3.0 motherboards
    will accept AGP 2.0 1.5v cards. It
    depends on the design of the motherboard. Some
    AGP 3.0 motherboards will support
    only AGP 3.0 and some will support both AGP 2.0
    and AGP 3.0. Since this is still
    a draft spec any of the info on AGP 3.0 is
    subject to change.

    ............................

    'It' mite make sense to you ... best ask a "TomG" type.

    Qed
     
    0_Qed, Oct 30, 2003
    #2
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  3. David. E. Goble

    Skid Guest

    The answer to the last question is no. 8X is 8X, and there aren't any
    consumer-level cards I know of that require AGP Pro.

    Pro was intended to provide more power, but because there are so few
    motherboards that support it the cardmakers that need that much juice went
    with a second power connector.

    The few motherboards I've seen that offer AGP Pro include a small plug to
    close off unused parts of the slot so a standard AGP card won't rattle
    around.

    The Pro and non-pro designations on Radeon cards denote clock speed and have
    nothing to do with AGP Pro.
     
    Skid, Oct 30, 2003
    #3
  4. That actually got me looking into it. Friend bought a Asus p4c800 and
    I am looking at the p4p800. I did not notice the p4c had a pro50 slot.

    We wandered what that was for lol. So the slot is a bit longer than an
    normal agp slot. THat might explain why the p4c does not come with the
    card lock thingy.
    Knew that already. Thanks for your reply.
     
    David. E. Goble, Oct 30, 2003
    #4
  5. "David. E. Goble" wrote in message ...
    The extra conductors on the "Pro50" slots are extra power lines, enabling
    power hungry GPU's to draw increased levels of current direct from the
    motherboard. However...
    Think you'll find that most of the modern ATi/nVidia cards have an onboard
    connector to facilitate direct connection to the PSU. In that case there's
    no advantage to having an AGP Pro slot on the motherboard.
    --


    Richard Hopkins
    Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
    (replace .nospam with .com in reply address)

    The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com
    Out with the old & in with the new at www.dabsxchange.com
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    Richard Hopkins, Oct 30, 2003
    #5
  6. David. E. Goble

    TomG Guest

    no clue from me on that difference...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 118,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^
     
    TomG, Oct 30, 2003
    #6
  7. David. E. Goble

    TomG Guest

    ah! yes, I have seen the little white insert to close off part of the AGP
    slot when using a non-Pro card but just didn't trip to the terminology...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 118,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^
     
    TomG, Oct 30, 2003
    #7
  8. David. E. Goble

    nolo Guest


    ? my p4c800 deluxe does have an AGP pro and did come with the protective
    tab.
     
    nolo, Oct 30, 2003
    #8
  9. David. E. Goble

    Steve Vai Guest

    thats what that was?!? my old soyo kt333 had a little timy piece of
    grey plastic blocking the first few connections and i never noticed it
    until i removed the board to sell it....i was like "wtf is this grey
    plastic? did i put that in there or did it come like that...." so i
    decided to leave it LOL
     
    Steve Vai, Oct 30, 2003
    #9
  10. David. E. Goble

    Neil Guest


    I seem to remember something about Asus video cards and Asus boards taking
    advantage of this agp pro slot back in the kt266, kt333 days, haven't really
    heard much about it since.


    Neil
     
    Neil, Oct 30, 2003
    #10
  11. AGP Pro is really only used by the super-powerful professional-grade
    cards. The ones that cost several hundred dollars and more. For
    example, the higher-end ATI FireGL models (but not even the entry level
    FireGL cards), the 3D Labs Wildcat cards, etc. AGP Pro isn't used by
    the gamer cards (which resort to using a floppy drive power connector if
    they need more power), only by the cards favoured by engineers and other
    graphics professionals.
     
    John-Paul Stewart, Oct 30, 2003
    #11
  12. My housemates Gigabyte motherboard came with a AGP socket with the white tab
    in. He has a Radeon 9500 and D3D wasn't working (like no picture when
    enabled in games.) Checked drivers and everything else. Finally removed the
    tab from the port and it now works. I don't get it, as his card doesn't
    utilise those pins. Dodgy.

    Mike
     
    Michael George, Oct 31, 2003
    #12
  13. David. E. Goble

    TomG Guest

    maybe the card was just not seating correctly or something and removing the
    tab helped with that issue...

    --

    Thomas Geery
    Network+ certified

    ftp://geerynet.d2g.com
    ftp://68.98.180.8 Abit Mirror <----- Cable modem IP
    This IP is dynamic so it *could* change!...
    over 118,000 FTP users served!
    ^^^^^^^
     
    TomG, Oct 31, 2003
    #13
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