why HP computers are CRAPuters

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Anne Onime, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. Anne Onime

    Anne Onime Guest

    I was trying to fix a HP Pavillion, what did not boot.
    Seems the motherboard is totally hosed. So I took out
    the disk to see if that was okay. Plugged in into another
    PC, and notice it has 80 GB primary partition and 5 GB
    recovery partition. Yet the drive is 160 GB - so they are
    wasting a good part of the disk.
    Fukken deadshit weasels - why can't they give a customer
    all the disk?
     
    Anne Onime, Nov 16, 2010
    #1
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  2. Anne Onime

    Ben Myers Guest

    They ran out of 80GB hard drives. Pretty common in the biz these days.
    In fact, been going on for years, ever since hard drives became cheap
    commodities back in the IDE days. I have even seen hard drives with the
    firmware changed so the partitioning and formatting software cannot see
    the entire capacity of a hard drive. Of course, there is software to
    plug the correct values into the drive firmware so you can see the whole
    drive. And it's not just HP that does it. I am not defending HP. Just
    the facts, m'am... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Nov 16, 2010
    #2
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  3. Anne Onime

    Brian Smith Guest

    Hopefully this isn't a stupid question but is there any logic behind why
    they would do this?

    Brian
     
    Brian Smith, Nov 16, 2010
    #3
  4. Anne Onime

    Iowna Uass Guest

    The original disk image was built for an 80 gig drive.
    You can resize it using diskpart or various other resizing utilities
    available.
     
    Iowna Uass, Nov 16, 2010
    #4
  5. Anne Onime

    Ben Myers Guest

    To maintain consistency of procedure when the computer is being
    manufactured, er, assembled. In the case where the drive firmware was
    cobbled to give a lower capacity, there may have been a govt contract
    that required all computers of the given model to be "identical." If
    the drive firmware said the drive was 40GB instead of the true 80GB, the
    system would look and feel identical in all respects to the others with
    40GB drives. It confounds me how government and large enterprise
    procurement weenies obsess over having the exact part or exact
    specifications (down to the stupid "official" vendor part number
    sticker), when inexpensive commodity alternatives are available. In the
    case of the govt, your tax dollars at work... Ben Myers
     
    Ben Myers, Nov 17, 2010
    #5
  6. Anne Onime

    Brian Smith Guest

    I see and understand given that the government might have been involved.

    Brian
     
    Brian Smith, Nov 17, 2010
    #6
  7. Anne Onime

    Tom Lake Guest

    ?To maintain consistency of procedure when the computer is being
    manufactured, er, assembled. In the case where the drive firmware was
    cobbled to give a lower capacity, there may have been a govt contract
    that required all computers of the given model to be "identical." If
    the drive firmware said the drive was 40GB instead of the true 80GB, the
    system would look and feel identical in all respects to the others with
    40GB drives. It confounds me how government and large enterprise
    procurement weenies obsess over having the exact part or exact
    specifications (down to the stupid "official" vendor part number
    sticker), when inexpensive commodity alternatives are available. In the
    case of the govt, your tax dollars at work... Ben Myers

    There are two good reasons why this is done. One: there are many vendors
    vying for gov't contracts. The specs have to be precise and followed to the
    letter
    otherwise vendors who lost the bid would sue Uncle Sam. Defending against
    all those lawsuits is much more costly than paying more per piece even if
    the
    gov't is exonerated. Two: The inventory system is so complex and the
    database
    is so large, it would be unwieldy to keep track of multiple-spec parts. Do
    you
    have any idea how many nuts, bolts, light bulbs and rolls of toilet paper
    the
    Army has on hand? Not to mention ordinance, uniforms, computers, etc.
    And that's just one branch of the service! Every single part down to the
    last
    washer and nut has to be cataloged and inventoried. I wrote part of the
    Army's
    inventory software at the Ft. Lee, VA Quartermaster Center. I knew how to
    find
    anything a Colonel or General needed. A dozen thermal liners for helmets
    in
    Reykjavik? I can have them there tomorrow. Don't believe every bad thing
    you
    read about the government. There are thousands of dedicated men and women
    working hard to maintain a very complex system. It might look foolish from
    the
    outside but try running the government yourself. It ain't easy!

    Tom Lake
     
    Tom Lake, Nov 17, 2010
    #7
  8. Anne Onime

    buddy b Guest

    Right on.
    Of course there are exceptions to MILSPEC parts, especially when you
    can`t find them.
    My son, a NUKE on an attack sub in the 80s, fixed components several
    times with Radio Shack resistors,caps, when the Navy was asking the Capt
    why wasn`t he at sea on patrol, and Capt was all over my son as to when
    it would be fixed. When told now with Radio Shack parts and who in the
    hell knows with Navy parts, the Capt said go to Radio Shack and lets get
    going.
    Never had any problems with RS parts.

    I also like my HP cpr.

    Regards
    buddy b
     
    buddy b, Nov 29, 2010
    #8
  9. Anne Onime

    Lucky Guest

    This much I can say for sure.
    The wireless keyboard and mouse on my wife's HP computer have worked
    flawlessly since I set it up for her.
    While the wireless keyboard and mouse on my Dell have NEVER worked properly.
    All I have gotten
    from Dell is "We have a software update coming that will fix the problem.".
    For 4 years now Dell has been
    promising a fix. FOUR YEARS.
    After more than $20K in computer purchases from Dell over the last 10
    years---NO MORE DELLS HERE.

    Lucky
     
    Lucky, Nov 29, 2010
    #9
  10. Anne Onime

    Lucky Guest

    This much I can say for sure.
    The wireless keyboard and mouse on my wife's HP computer have worked
    flawlessly since I set it up for her.
    While the wireless keyboard and mouse on my Dell have NEVER worked properly.
    All I have gotten
    from Dell is "We have a software update coming that will fix the problem.".
    For 4 years now Dell has been
    promising a fix. FOUR YEARS.
    After more than $20K in computer purchases from Dell over the last 10
    years---NO MORE DELLS HERE.

    Lucky
     
    Lucky, Nov 29, 2010
    #10
  11. Anne Onime

    Lucky Guest

    This much I can say for sure.
    The wireless keyboard and mouse on my wife's HP computer have worked
    flawlessly since I set it up for her.
    While the wireless keyboard and mouse on my Dell have NEVER worked properly.
    All I have gotten
    from Dell is "We have a software update coming that will fix the problem.".
    For 4 years now Dell has been
    promising a fix. FOUR YEARS.
    After more than $20K in computer purchases from Dell over the last 10
    years---NO MORE DELLS HERE.

    Lucky
     
    Lucky, Nov 29, 2010
    #11
  12. Anne Onime

    Captainbob

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2010
    Messages:
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    Location:
    Princeton, MN, USA
    I have been a user of HP computers and products for many years now, and have had few problems. Here is my HP list--
    HP computers at my work, several over the past 10 years, the only reason we got new ones was to upgrade, the one I am currently typing this on we have had here over 2 years, my complaints about it is Windows Vista, the crappy onboard Nvidia 6150 graphics, and the preinstalled bloatware. I suppose my biggest complaint about a HP computer could be all the extra crap bloatware that comes with it.
    I own 2 HP computers that are used regularly every day for basic computing needs, one from 2001 and other from 2004, the only things that have had to be replaced are hard drives, and it seems like they are expendable anyway, always have an extra on hand, and adding some memory to help speed, uninstalling all the bloatware.
    My other half has a HP printer/scanner/fax she bought in 1999 that has been used several times a week since and still works as good as ever.
    Overall HP has been good to us.
     
    Captainbob, Dec 1, 2010
    #12
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