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Wireless Router speed question

Discussion in 'Laptops' started by Malcolm, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. Malcolm

    Malcolm Guest

    I have just installed DSL broadband and have an Asus W1000N laptop on order
    and I want to get a router such that I can hard-wire the desktop and
    wireless-link the laptop to both an internal LAN and the internet
    connection. D-Link have a suitable looking gizmo that uses the 802.11g
    standard (as per laptop) and includes 4 Ethernet ports but it comes in 2
    flavours, one delivering 52 MB/S wireless and the other 108 MB/S. My
    question is will I be able to use the full 108 MB/S speed with the Wi-Fi
    setup that ships with the laptop? My guess is that the speed doubling
    comes from some fancy compression used in the router and will only work with
    matching D-Link interface cards installed in the PC, so maybe speed would be
    limited to 52 MB/S with non-D-Link kit installed in the laptop - am I right?

    Obviously the reason for asking is that the slower router is cheaper and I
    hate wasting cash!

    Cheers
    Malcolm
     
    Malcolm, Feb 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. Malcolm

    Andrew Guest

    : I have just installed DSL broadband and have an Asus W1000N laptop on order
    : and I want to get a router such that I can hard-wire the desktop and
    : wireless-link the laptop to both an internal LAN and the internet
    : connection. D-Link have a suitable looking gizmo that uses the 802.11g
    : standard (as per laptop) and includes 4 Ethernet ports but it comes in 2
    : flavours, one delivering 52 MB/S wireless and the other 108 MB/S. My
    : question is will I be able to use the full 108 MB/S speed with the Wi-Fi
    : setup that ships with the laptop? My guess is that the speed doubling
    : comes from some fancy compression used in the router and will only work with
    : matching D-Link interface cards installed in the PC, so maybe speed would be
    : limited to 52 MB/S with non-D-Link kit installed in the laptop - am I right?

    Yeah, it's going to depend on the wireless card in the laptop. If
    it's 802.11g standard, it's probably only 54Mbps and won't be able to
    go 108Mbps to the router. If you really need that speed, you could
    get a PC Card D-link wireless card that goes that fast, but it sounds
    like you don't.

    Andrew
    --
    ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
    *******************************************************************
    ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
    ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
    *******************************************************************
     
    Andrew, Feb 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. Not only will you not be able to use the full 108MB/sec, but in fact an
    802.11b router, with a speed 90% slower than the accelerated "g" router,
    would still be faster -- a LOT faster -- than your internet connection.
    DLS has a speed of only hundreds of thousands of megabytes per second,
    which is far, far, far less than 100 million bytes per second. Speed
    isn't a factor in terms of the internet connection. However, if you
    will be transferring large files between the desktop and laptop, that
    could be much more of an issue, as that could use the full bandwidth of
    whichever link you choose (only for brief periods of time, however).

    [two weeks ago Best Buy had a D-Link Router AND WiFi PC Card bundle on
    sale for $19.95 after 2 rebates -- for BOTH the router and PC card. It
    was the 802.11g router, but without the speed doubling technology (e.g.
    54 MB/sec, not 108). My system here is still 802.11b, which is only 10
    MB/sec, and I have cable modem, which is significantly faster -- as much
    as 5X faster -- than DSL. But even cable modem is not more than about
    20% the speed of lowly 802.11b.]
     
    Barry Watzman, Feb 24, 2005
    #3
  4. Malcolm

    Ian S Guest

    Others have mentioned that the speed difference is immaterial for internet
    activities but may be significant for large file transfers between your
    laptop and your desktop. Frankly, I think if you do a lot of large file
    transfers like that, you're better off using wired ethernet - just hook a
    cable between your wireless router and your laptop. For me the biggest
    limitation of current b and g wireless is range which can place additional
    limits on transfer speed. The new standard, n, which comes in 2006 promises
    much better range than now available. Belkin sells a "pre-N" router and
    cards that display this dramatic increase in range but it's considerably
    more expensive and it may not conform to the final standard - although I
    can't believe there wouldn't be some firmware release to solve that problem
    in 2006. If I were you, unless your main use is large (and I mean many
    hundreds of MB) file transfer, just go with the regular g which is cheaper
    and wait for the n standard in a year or two.

    BTW, does anyone know how well those add-on antennas work for improving the
    range of a router? I have a couple of spots in my house wher the reception
    is marginal and a better antenna might be a cost-effective way to alleviate
    that problem.
     
    Ian S, Feb 24, 2005
    #4
  5. In addition, the problem 108 routers present is that they use two 54 channels to
    get the 108 thruput, thereby generating more congestion within a neighborhood.
    Now if the houses are spread out, or not a lot of people in the neighborhood are
    using wifi, no problem.

    TJ
     
    Capt. 'Wild' Bill Kelso, USAAC, Feb 24, 2005
    #5
  6. Malcolm

    Malcolm Guest

    Thanks folks, very useful and informative replies.

    I certainly will not bother with the 108 in my situation, but I will stick
    to to the 802.11g standard - just occasionally I do need to move large files
    between laptop/desktop PCs internally so I think it will be worth it.

    Now I'm away to spend the money saved on a decent bottle of red - Cheers!

    Malcolm
     
    Malcolm, Feb 24, 2005
    #6
  7. Malcolm

    Andrew Guest

    : Thanks folks, very useful and informative replies.

    : I certainly will not bother with the 108 in my situation, but I will stick
    : to to the 802.11g standard - just occasionally I do need to move large files
    : between laptop/desktop PCs internally so I think it will be worth it.

    Well, for those rare occasions, you could always plug your Ethernet
    cable in and do a direct network. That's what I do.

    Andrew
    --
    ----> Portland, Oregon, USA <----
    *******************************************************************
    ----> http://www.bizave.com <---- Photo Albums and Portland Info
    ----> To Email me remove "MYSHOES" from email address
    *******************************************************************
     
    Andrew, Feb 24, 2005
    #7
  8. Malcolm

    Ben in TN Guest

    I've got a Linksys WRT54G router and I bought those longer and supposedly
    higher gain antennas and the increase in signal was almost nothing. That
    was with me using a Linksys 54G card in my old laptop. I recently bought a
    www.parkervision.com card and that card was much more sensitive and received
    the same Linksys router much better. Went from low signal to very good most
    of the time at the other end of my house. I also recently sold that same
    laptop and bought a new HP laptop with wireless built in and the HP laptop
    receives like my old Toshiba did with the Parker Vision card. I'll be
    curious to see exactly how well the built in wireless does compared to the
    Parker Vision when trying to connect from farther distances. There is a
    website that sells their own firmware version to use on Linksys routers
    www.sveasoft.com which is supposed to allow you to increase the transmitted
    power of some Linksys routers. I'm thinking about paying the $20 to get
    their software. Has anyone else used their software? I'm also curious
    about the built in 54g(TM) 802.11b/g WLAN w/ 125HSM/SpeedBooster(TM) that
    came in my HP notebook. Like I said it appears to be pretty sensitive. I
    wonder what routers will be compatible with that doing 125 HSM?

    Ben
     
    Ben in TN, Mar 13, 2005
    #8
  9. Malcolm

    wbw Guest

    The Sveasoft firmware should be available free. Evidently Linkxys
    released their source code under the GPL, so any derivative works must
    also be released under the GPL. You shouldn't have to pay for this
    software. It looks like you just have to subscribe for the current
    development version; previous stable releases are freely available.
    Look at the FAQ section on the sveasoft.com website for some more info.

    A very popular thread with people's experiences with this firmware is here:

    http://forums.anandtech.com/messageview.aspx?catid=40&threadid=1343138

    Of course, the $20 would probably be a nice thing to do.... support further
    development, etc.
     
    wbw, Mar 13, 2005
    #9
  10. Malcolm

    tc Guest

    There was an article in the Mar 22 PC Mag giving links to the open source
    location that can provide a version of Linksys software (Seasoft Sartori)
    that performs those functions for free.
    www.linksysinfo.com
    Terry
     
    tc, Mar 13, 2005
    #10
  11. Malcolm

    Ben in TN Guest

    Thanks for passing that info along.

     
    Ben in TN, Mar 14, 2005
    #11
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